Author Topic: Pinning resin kits during pre-building  (Read 3549 times)

January 09, 2009, 04:06:39 AM
Read 3549 times

merkava74

  • Information
  • New Member
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Hi, I would like to find out the various methods modellers here use to pin resin kits during their pre-building. I have searched these forums and all I can find was a suggestion to add a drop of paint on one piece to align the drill holes.

Is there any other way to ensure that the pinning is accurate?

Thanks.

January 09, 2009, 09:03:12 AM
Reply #1

silent1

  • *
  • Information
  • Member
  • Posts: 43
  • Karma: 1
    • View Profile
Bluetack may be your best bet for help with pinning. I have used it and have always had good luck with it, granted it isnt perfect but much better then just drilling blind.

That you want to do is dill holes into the first piece that you plan on pinning. Next on the second piece put a thin layer of bluetack over the area that will be pinned. See first picture.


Then press the two pieces together, making sure any alignment keys are in place. Remove the pieces carefully and now you will have a positive image of where the pin holes are on the other piece and the general direction that the pin hole goes in. See the below picture. Then just drill through the bluetack and you have a piece that is pretty well pinned. Also as a suggestion slightly enlarge the openings where the pins go to allow for some wiggle room with the pin.

« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 11:44:49 AM by silent1 »

January 09, 2009, 05:26:21 PM
Reply #2

merkava74

  • Information
  • New Member
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Thanks. That looks like a good method. Will try it out.

January 09, 2009, 07:34:09 PM
Reply #3

mtomczek

  • paid by the force
  • *****
  • Information
  • Member
  • Posts: 1781
  • Karma: 5
    • View Profile
    • http://www.mtomczek.com
Just a real quick question. I've noticed on the "other" forum that you are hunting for a 1/35 G-System Ex-S, and yet you are asking how to pin resin kits?

From my experience (I've built a bunch of g-system kits/resin kits) you may want to try something else before trying to tackle the Ex-S. Its a massive kit that requires a ton of work, and alot of space to display it.

I am not saying you shouldn't buy it, cause honestly its your money and you can do whatever you want with it.

I would only recommend trying some smaller kits first. The amount of paint required for that Ex-S alone is at least a few kits to practice on. I am betting you will need probably about $150 - $250 worth of paint to finish that thing. Thats not even including clear coat, or anything else.

January 10, 2009, 12:56:51 AM
Reply #4

merkava74

  • Information
  • New Member
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Just a real quick question. I've noticed on the "other" forum that you are hunting for a 1/35 G-System Ex-S, and yet you are asking how to pin resin kits?

From my experience (I've built a bunch of g-system kits/resin kits) you may want to try something else before trying to tackle the Ex-S. Its a massive kit that requires a ton of work, and alot of space to display it.

I am not saying you shouldn't buy it, cause honestly its your money and you can do whatever you want with it.

I would only recommend trying some smaller kits first. The amount of paint required for that Ex-S alone is at least a few kits to practice on. I am betting you will need probably about $150 - $250 worth of paint to finish that thing. Thats not even including clear coat, or anything else.

I must have absolutely confused you with these posts. I am not a new modeller. Have been for 22 years. I have built various kits and various materials, including resins. In fact, this would be my 4th G-system kit. I have been looking for the 1/35 EX-S for a couple of years after repeatedly missing G-sys's productions... So I am really elated that I found it.

As for the pinning question, you know, the funny thing is, I have NEVER pinned my models. So when I browsed through this forum and found several mention of pinning, it got me interested, and seriously would be a good step to follow. You must also have found out that I asked the exact same question in the "other" forum. :P

So I hope I have clarified your doubts, and really, thanks for always looking out for over-zealous new modellers buying gigantic kits! : )
« Last Edit: January 10, 2009, 01:02:37 AM by merkava74 »

January 10, 2009, 04:39:56 AM
Reply #5

fulcy

  • Genius is never understood in its own time
  • *****
  • Information
  • Member
  • Moderator
  • Posts: 2135
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
    • http://www.mechaskunk.com
The other method I've employed pinning resin kits, is to use a small dot of paint, or something that can transfer between the two parts.  Put the dot of paint where you want the pin on one of the parts, and put them together.  the paint, as long as there isn't a huge gap, should transfer.  Now you know where to drill.  In one part, I drill a hole that's almost the exact size of the pin I am using, and glue it in.  In the other part, I drill an oversized hole, so there is some slop.  When I assemble, I put some 5 minute epoxy in the oversized hole, put the parts together, and hold them till the epoxy kicks - that way you get a perfect alignment.

Another way to do this - but this can not be used in all situations:

Assemble the two parts together, and drill from the outside, through one part and into the other part.  As long as the parts haven't moved during drilling, they should line up perfectly when you pin them together.  Obviously, this method only work on pins near the edge of parts, and in areas where it's easy to clean up the external surface of the part...

January 10, 2009, 10:52:53 AM
Reply #6

mtomczek

  • paid by the force
  • *****
  • Information
  • Member
  • Posts: 1781
  • Karma: 5
    • View Profile
    • http://www.mtomczek.com
The other method I've employed pinning resin kits, is to use a small dot of paint, or something that can transfer between the two parts.  Put the dot of paint where you want the pin on one of the parts, and put them together.  the paint, as long as there isn't a huge gap, should transfer.  Now you know where to drill.  In one part, I drill a hole that's almost the exact size of the pin I am using, and glue it in.  In the other part, I drill an oversized hole, so there is some slop.  When I assemble, I put some 5 minute epoxy in the oversized hole, put the parts together, and hold them till the epoxy kicks - that way you get a perfect alignment.

Another way to do this - but this can not be used in all situations:

Assemble the two parts together, and drill from the outside, through one part and into the other part.  As long as the parts haven't moved during drilling, they should line up perfectly when you pin them together.  Obviously, this method only work on pins near the edge of parts, and in areas where it's easy to clean up the external surface of the part...

I actually use both of these methods on almost all of my builds. The last one works great on objects that might be hard to line up the drill holes, but you have the surface area to fill the hole from the outside, and sand it smooth. So just drill through the parts, get a perfect match, then fix the hole.

January 11, 2009, 05:54:05 AM
Reply #7

merkava74

  • Information
  • New Member
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Thanks to all the responses. I tend to agree with mtomczek... drilling through is the most accurate. But more tedious as you would have to fill up the hole on the surface side. I guess in the end, it's a combination of methods depending on the part that you are trying to pin.

Thanks again!

January 11, 2009, 10:34:47 AM
Reply #8

GlauG

  • **
  • Information
  • Member
  • Posts: 330
  • Karma: 0
  • Decepticon Ninja Consultant
    • View Profile
Assemble the two parts together, and drill from the outside, through one part and into the other part.  As long as the parts haven't moved during drilling, they should line up perfectly when you pin them together.  Obviously, this method only work on pins near the edge of parts, and in areas where it's easy to clean up the external surface of the part...

With mecha figures you can be lazy, use pins with small heads, and call them rivets if you leave them exposed. >_>;  I'm doing this on one of my Core-Works conversions.