Author Topic: Desert-Use Scopedog (1/20)  (Read 20255 times)

December 14, 2008, 11:19:29 PM
Reply #40

walker

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Alright I'm going to be the a-hole here and point out that in Votoms the Red Shoulders only have the right shoulder colored red (not both, like you have in blue). Either way I love a lot of these techniques and it's looking really awesome so far. While we all love the cleanliness of your usual builds it's nice seeing you do a more grungy mecha. I can't wait to see how this turns out.

[edited to include obligatory Votoms recommendation for those of you who have yet to see it]
« Last Edit: December 14, 2008, 11:20:17 PM by walker »
By the way, say hi to Chris!

December 15, 2008, 05:47:28 AM
Reply #41

FichtenFoo

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And I'll call you an a-hole and point out that it's just ONE shoulder painted blue and shown from both sides in 2 pics. ;) :razz: Thanks for playing though! :lol: I mentioned that in my write-up but maybe wasn't clear enough.

As for grungy v/s clean, I do grunge, just not on Gundams. I prefer mine to be clean and factory fresh with that super-robot feel. My AFVs, MaK and other mecha are all dirtied and weathered up. This is a new level of degradation though so hopefully it works out. So far it's looking pretty balled-up in the best possible way.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 05:47:46 AM by FichtenFoo »

December 15, 2008, 09:21:06 AM
Reply #42

walker

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From the writeup

Quote from: FichtenFoo
the other shoulder
Quote from: FichtenFoo
a shoulder

K you win this round. :P

And yeah i've seen your other stuff and know you CAN do weathering, but aside from your GM [g] I'm just used to seeing your humanoid-esque, more-or-less foot-tall Bandai-produced MG-esque model kits of mecha from Sunrise shows in a clean style (the RRR and 1/20 Votoms kits being as close to that as possible without actually being Gundam, save for maybe the Patlabor and Dunbine MGs), and it's what I and I'd think a lot of people think of as your style, so either way it's nice to see it for a change. If that makes any sense at all.

And this is why I rarely post and instead just look at the pretty pictures.
By the way, say hi to Chris!

December 15, 2008, 09:37:35 AM
Reply #43

FichtenFoo

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No worries... just thought your post deserved a good ribbing!

December 15, 2008, 11:02:28 AM
Reply #44

walker

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Oh, it did. Luckily for you I can take it as well as I can dish it out. :D

Not like anyone cares, but my scopedog (about a year old, gotten a lot better since then; not sure this is the right place to post it etc., but I don't care enough to make a new topic about it, especially since it's not that good and I'm not necessarily looking for comments/critique):

http://i216.photobucket.com/albums/cc160/dicklaser/IAmTheSexiest.jpg

I actually didn't paint it aside from the one red shoulder and red on the skirt under the red shoulder logo, just flat coated and weathered it (wanted to do something like this one guy did on his no-paint MG Mark II that I lost the link to). Since I did this i've done a ton of research on weathering and think I could pull it off a lot better were I to do it again. (Got mine, RRR Layzner, and Alpha Azieru for a combined like $60 or so in an EPIC HLJ sale.)

While I'm at it, might as well watch the OVA Armored Trooper Votoms: The Last Two Blue Shoulders.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 11:03:29 AM by walker »
By the way, say hi to Chris!

December 15, 2008, 03:17:53 PM
Reply #45

fredpekker

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Foo, this looks great. Can't wait to see it all put together. I think you've taken used and abused to a whole new level. By the way, are you making a base for this?
Quote
Not like anyone cares, but my scopedog (about a year old, gotten a lot better since then; not sure this is the right place to post it etc., but I don't care enough to make a new topic about it, especially since it's not that good and I'm not necessarily looking for comments/critique)
I know you weren't looking for any comment or crit but i gotta tell you, for "no paint" your dog doesn't look too bad. The seam on the rifle screams at me, but no worries as long as you were/are happy with it.

December 15, 2008, 03:37:39 PM
Reply #46

walker

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Foo, this looks great. Can't wait to see it all put together. I think you've taken used and abused to a whole new level. By the way, are you making a base for this?
Quote
Not like anyone cares, but my scopedog (about a year old, gotten a lot better since then; not sure this is the right place to post it etc., but I don't care enough to make a new topic about it, especially since it's not that good and I'm not necessarily looking for comments/critique)
I know you weren't looking for any comment or crit but i gotta tell you, for "no paint" your dog doesn't look too bad. The seam on the rifle screams at me, but no worries as long as you were/are happy with it.

Thanks. I didn't do seams either because I thought the color differentiation after sanded would be too obvious without paint.
By the way, say hi to Chris!

December 15, 2008, 03:45:48 PM
Reply #47

FichtenFoo

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Foo, this looks great. Can't wait to see it all put together. I think you've taken used and abused to a whole new level. By the way, are you making a base for this?

Heh... another bashing to be done. Check back and see the Jersey Barrier? :razz: Thanks though... wait till you see the next progress report. Sun bleaching and yet another 2 methods for creating rust.

I love rust.

I know... I'm odd.

walker: Yeah, that looks good. The silver though for the chipping makes it look glossy in the pics. Not sure of some further weathering would tone that down. Maybe try adding some filters and the discoloration technique to it with oils.

December 15, 2008, 05:21:25 PM
Reply #48

walker

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Foo, this looks great. Can't wait to see it all put together. I think you've taken used and abused to a whole new level. By the way, are you making a base for this?

Heh... another bashing to be done. Check back and see the Jersey Barrier? :razz: Thanks though... wait till you see the next progress report. Sun bleaching and yet another 2 methods for creating rust.

I love rust.

I know... I'm odd.

walker: Yeah, that looks good. The silver though for the chipping makes it look glossy in the pics. Not sure of some further weathering would tone that down. Maybe try adding some filters and the discoloration technique to it with oils.

yeah, the silver plus camera flash jsut makes it look like it's gloss coated, which is why I chip with grays and rusts now. it really depends on the sunlight, unfortunately--from some angles the black and dark tan washes are more evident and it retains a flat look, and for some all you see is lol silver everywhere.

Discoloration technique = where you put bits of colored paint and smear them with a brush soaked in thinner?
By the way, say hi to Chris!

December 16, 2008, 06:06:08 PM
Reply #49

FichtenFoo

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Huge update!

That's right... rust done three different ways so far on this build. The first way is a new product I heard about and decided to give a change. This product is called Rustall. (visit their website here) Rustall comes as individual bottles or as a set of 4. Bottle 1 is the rust solution, #2 is "blackwash", #3 is a matt coating, and #4 is dirt as seen in the cup below.



Using this stuff is pretty straightforward and simple and it yields some great results, however it's not the end-all solution to everymodel and takes a little practice to start getting the look you desire. There's instructions on a review on thei website, but here's how I've been using it which makes it a little simpler I think.

First pour the dirt contents of Bottle #4 into a dish. Start out with bottle #3, the matt finish. Brush this on the part to be rusted. It goes on nice and thin and levels out beautifully. I really like this stuff! While the part is still tacky, coat it with the dirt in the dish. (the instructions say to do this dirt-dip while your paint is still wet, but my airbrushed paint dries too quick for that) Take a soft brush and brush away the excess dirt.

You'll not notice much of a change in the finish or color with the added dirt, but the dirt is important. It's clay-based and makes for a nice texture and makes the rust solution distribute evenly. Once that's all dry brush on an even coat of bottle #1, the rust solution. It goes on very thin and you won't see much noticible rust on the first try. You add more layers to build-up rust. Without the dirt, the rust solution tends to run like a wash and not "stick" where you want it.

You can add more and more layers of the rust solution, drying in-between but that will leave a fairly even and solid coating of rust. For a more realistic look I brush my second/third coats in random spots and then blend them in with water over the rest of the part. That way the rust builds up in some spots and not consistently over the whole piece. Looks more interesting and realistic this way.

Here's the rust solution added to a shovel. Note the "blade" of the shovel was painted in a neutral gray then sponged with lighter and darker grays thinned with water to give it a mottled, but not textured look. I applied it to the whole blade and handle, the for the 2nd and 3rd apps only around the upper part of the shovel, blending it towards the point with water. The bucket was painted the same way, but no rust was applied yet. This shows the difference. I've found that this looks better if applied over an uneven-colored paint job and not a solid one.



The same technique was done with the Scopedog Visor. The visor was painted in Neutral Gray and mottled with water-thinned darker and lighter grays to give it an uneven, natural appearance. Then some rust colored actylic thinned with water was sponged on in a few key spots. Not doing it all over increases the realism and visual appeal.



Finally I coated it in the matt-finish/dirt-dip then a coat of the rust solution. A few more coatings of the rust solution were applied where I had sponged on the rust acrylic. Finally the part was coated in satin FFA for sealing for later filters and washes. It yealds a very realistic looking fresh rust over steel look though.



The next rust technique is pretty easy as well and yeilds some good results. I totally screwed up when removing the tape from the rust-base coat of this roll-cage and ended up pulling a lot of paint and primer off of the brass dot-plate. AAARRGGHH! I repainted and primed them by hand, but worried that the salt-rust method I showed a few updates ago (method #1 of 3 BTW) would rub the paint and primer off again.

So to do this more gently I tore off a chunk of sponge and dabbed on thinned acrylics in black-brown, rust, orange, and brown. This was really easy and the result is pretty cool. While it doesn't look like the other 2 rust methods I've shown, I think all three look great and show the variety of rust that occurs. If all the rust looked the same that might not look as interesting.



All three of these methods can benefit from being combined. Using the large amount of rust-colored pigments from Mig Productions will also enhance these techniques as I'll show later on when I get to that point. The next two pics of the external tank use several of these methods with good results.

The first rust was shown when I applied the salt over the rust-base coat with hairspray then removed it after painting with water. In a few spots I added more rust with the sponge technique.



The next pic is the aftermath of the first having applied the Rustall system to it. It's a subtle difference but enhances the look. Note that you're looking at the bottom of this hanging tank. The top won't be seen while strapped under the basket on the 'dog's back.



Next is the arm shield which shows the first method of rust I tried, the salt-method. (see a few updates ago for a Step-By-Step) I did this in a faded military green to make it look like an add-on to this refurbished 'dog. Later I'll rub a little graphite powder on the "blade" to make it look as if it's been recently used and that the rust has been worn off.



And here's part of the leg armor, also being rusted and chipped using the salt/hairspray method. With these buff-colored parts I sponged some very thin white-buff color in spots to simulate sun-fading of the paint. This part shows the most extreme example of this, others are more subtle. All of this though will be muted somewhat when filters, discoloration, wash, and pigments are applied later so don't be too shocked about the starkness of it.



And lastly is the insurgent with his base-coats of paint. Looks like crap, yes, but that's fine for this stage and lets me see what it'll look like color-wise later. More opaque oil-paint will be applied over this base-coat rendering it invisible later. The basecoat is important though since the oils are applied thin. Primer-gray would show through a thin white oil-paint for example.

« Last Edit: December 16, 2008, 06:10:53 PM by FichtenFoo »

December 17, 2008, 07:22:17 AM
Reply #50

chaos_theory

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The combination of the rusting techniques is stunning. The sponged brass dot-plate, the salt/hairspray on the painted armor, and adding the Rustall with these has produced some very realistic effects. 

There goes another $20  :stupid:
"Don't tell me. You're from outer space."
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December 17, 2008, 10:15:36 AM
Reply #51

Irk

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JPEG #44 & #38 are stunning!


There goes another $20  :stupid:

My thoughts exactly!

Write a wise saying and your name will live forever - Anonymous

December 17, 2008, 07:45:25 PM
Reply #52

FichtenFoo

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Thanks gents! Here's some more... hope this is helping you guys to become better modelers and try new things/genres! I better see a bunch of UCHG Type 61's done when they come out!

Quote
Modulation

Adam Wilder over at Mig Productions (makers of Mig Pigments and other fantastic products) developed a technique called "Modulation" for armor subjects. It's basically taking queues from figure painters in regard to light and shadow and applying that to armor. Light-to-dark gradations, highlighted/discolored panels, etc...

I have been doing that with this build. When I sprayen my buff and other colors I mixed lighter versions and highlighted with the airbrush where light would hit. Now after my first application of Mig's Sin Industries "Tan for Dark Yellow" filter I have been using their 502 Abteilung line of oils to highlight and shade areas of this build. This can really be seen well here on the body of the dog. Note the highlighted panels and how using darker and lighter mixes of the buff color plays with the light and shadow emphasizing detail on this kit.

Once this dries I'll apply another layer of the filter to blend all the colors together better. I'm loving the results though so far and they'll look even better after washes and discoloration pop out the panel lines! (scroll up for the "before" shot in an earlier update)


December 17, 2008, 09:41:52 PM
Reply #53

Mason

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Very nice!

In the miniatures world, we refer to filters as colour juices or glazes. But I can see how filter applies here, as the effect is much more subtle.

BTW, have you seen Pailsen Files? Some of the action scenes in that were fantastic; ATs paratrooping, ATs fitted with snowblowers on steroids, carving their own trenches as they ride. That series, as frustratingly plodding as it is, has some wonderfully detailed designs and sequences.

I'll be watching you closely, as I bit on HLJ's huge mark-down on 1:20 Scopedogs earlier this year and the box is taunting me.  ^_^

December 17, 2008, 10:38:27 PM
Reply #54

walker

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BTW, have you seen Pailsen Files? Some of the action scenes in that were fantastic; ATs paratrooping, ATs fitted with snowblowers on steroids, carving their own trenches as they ride. That series, as frustratingly plodding as it is, has some wonderfully detailed designs and sequences.

On that note, maybe a bit off-topic, but Armor Hunter Mellowlink (Votoms sidestory) is probably the best unknown anime out there.

Hurry up and finish ficht so I we can see the final product. This is going permanently in my tutorials folder.
By the way, say hi to Chris!

December 18, 2008, 01:05:19 AM
Reply #55

Sticky Fingers

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There goes another $20  :stupid:

Make that more like $35-$40, if you live outside the States that is. There doesn't seem to be a single supplier outside the USA.

So that probably makes me  :stupid: :stupid:

 :D
"Hang on a minute, lads, I've got a great idea!"

December 21, 2008, 07:20:35 PM
Reply #56

FichtenFoo

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Quote
12.21.08 ยป Filters and Discoloration

I mentioned earlier that I had applied a single coating of the Sin Industiries Filter to the scopedog. While the product itself is awesome, the thinner reacted bad with the Bandai plastic (as most thinners do actually, especially mineral spirits) and made a few parts brittle and cracked. This was really only where I had pre-snapped parts and there was pressure. The filter works great on other models plastics and resin, but Bandai plastic... sucks. So I blame Bandai more than the Sin Industries filter. The cracks I believe can mostly be fixed and won'd show up on the final build.

Instead I decided to use my usual Turpenoid + Oil Paints mix. I used the Mig Productions 502 Abteilung oil paints and made a yellow-orange filter to brughten-up and yellow the look more. Look at the photo above this sentence then the one below. Note that the highlights I did earlier are now more blended in and natural looking. THe filter ties all those colors together and enriches them.



After the filter I applied another satin coat of FFA then applied the discoloration. I used the 502 Abteilung line of oils as they're much better than my cheapies from Michaels. I used dark and light rust, blue, yellow, and dark mud. These were dabbed on the blended into the surface. The result is fantastic and really makes the surface look used, worn and more natural. Later I used more light and dark rust and added additional rusty streaks.



The following I learned a few builds ago by accident. I applied some graphite to a gun, but later did the discoloration technique with the oils and turpenoid. That blended in the graphite and made the surface look like worn metal. I did the same thing on the internals here. I painted everything in Tamiya Dark Gray then lightened panels and such with oils. After a satin coat I buffed on the graphite with my fingers, applied dabs of blue and rust oils, then blended it all in with turpenoid. The result is really great!



Lastly is the gun progress. This was painted as above substituting German Gray for Dark Gray. The wood was painte dby hand then coated in gloss FFA and later dulled with a satin coat and discoloration. I think the gun needs to be darker so I'll fix that later.


December 21, 2008, 07:30:02 PM
Reply #57

Lin.K

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that looks great FF, very subtle but adds great depth and detail.

Thanks for the heads up on the plastic because I am now the nervous owner of a Bandai Fatty Scopedog, very inspired by yourself and will do my best to break and crack it despite heeding all warnings and common sense...
Please check out my new online Gallery and Progress Reports!

Scale120

December 21, 2008, 09:23:49 PM
Reply #58

Mason

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Sweet work FF, she looks excellent!

Looking closer at the rusted armour plate and the collar, my gut tells me that that area needs to be darker, like it's received some oil or lube from the sensor actuators and makes the rust darker and the paint hold more dust around the collar.

Lincoln, the Fatty's are my favourite design from VOTOMS, I can't wait to see your progress pictures.  :-)

December 22, 2008, 02:48:55 AM
Reply #59

ZLuca

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As usual, I love your WIPs. Pics are beautiful, a true pleasure to watch.
Funny what you've learned making mistakes. Great tip the graphyte use.
I love the contrast between head and the rest in rusty metal.
Can't wait to see it finished and curious to see your display choices.
GREAT WORK!
z

will do my best to break and crack it despite heeding all warnings and common sense...

I already love it! :D Excited to see what you can do on it, and above all, how it'll be painted.
I love Fatty... ^_^
Good work!