Author Topic: 1/6 Humanoid Tortoise Creature BJD  (Read 242 times)

September 13, 2020, 06:36:32 PM
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FichtenFoo

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I decided to hold off on taking the final Proxie Frame BJD pics and start on my next project. When I first started understanding Ball-Jointed Dolls aka Elastic Tension Figures, I thought that perhaps I could utilize that method to make a lot of the creatures and aliens I'd been wanting to make as well as perhaps some robots. The joint system is really interesting and is easier/more reliable than making the usual plastic joints for scratchbuilds, especially if you want poseable resin kits. This joint system can be adapted to robots with more rounded joints. During this in-prog thread, I'll detail my build as well as the process for making these types of joints. Now onto the project!

I've purchased and started painting several original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle garage kits over the years. For some reason though I've always stalled on them. I've also wanted to see if I could make a creature body BJD style and hide as much of the joint seams in the creature details as possible. Combining these two seemed like fun. But I don't just want to make a standard TMNT... I want to make a humanoid tortoise that *could* be a TMNT if geared as such, or an alien, or just a stand-alone. Hell... give it a baseball cap and kerchief and it could be some sort of Franklin the Turtle from the PBS kids cartoon. hahah! I want to make this look more like an actual turtle than any of the fan-art and sculpts I've seen.

For this figure I want to sculpt the whole thing, break it apart, then modify as needed to do the joints. So I started off by making an armature from aluminum armature wire from Michael's. I used a 1/6 figure body to proportion this frame properly.




I'll need to cut the sculpture into parts, and Sculpey can be a bit brittle and heavy rotary tooling to cut the aluminum wire can mean a lot of resculpting. To avoid a lot of aluminum cuts, as well as to bulk up the shape to help avoid cracking due to thick Sculpey, I applied aluminum foil all over the armature.




The armature is decent enough, but frankly the aluminum wire isn't very strong so I applied a very thin layer of Sculpey over the aluminum. This creates a durable shell that I can now sculpt over. I poked holes to avoid potential bubbles trapped between the aluminum and Sculpey. I also make a foil ball wad and made a Sculpey shell to form the larger shell over.




A trick I figured out is that if you rub/brush some Sculpey solvent/thinner onto the baked clay. the new unbaked clay will stick to it better.



The following rest of the images are basically adding more and more Sculpey to first get a somewhat muscular/bulky human form, then adding more layers and detail over that. So far I'm still in the process of blocking out the basic muscles and shapes of the shell. Once I'm happy with that, I can move onto more detail. I want the torso to be articulated for dynamic action poses, so I'm using the segments of the shell to differentiate between the three torso segments. I'll be attaching the shell to just the top segment and don't plan to have it reach all the way down past its butt cheeks. I will have wrap-around shell detail on the other segments though so it's not just tortoise-skin. More soon!
















« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 11:59:44 AM by FichtenFoo »

September 14, 2020, 04:50:09 AM
Reply #1

Marc

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It's really interesting seeing you build up the shape!
Regarding the joints, are you making them or using existing parts?

September 14, 2020, 11:37:25 AM
Reply #2

FichtenFoo

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It's really interesting seeing you build up the shape!
Regarding the joints, are you making them or using existing parts?
I'll be making them and detailing the process. It's really simple actually. Looking at this persons flickr will give you an idea of how they work if you look at some of her progs: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bimong11/

September 14, 2020, 11:48:35 AM
Reply #3

FichtenFoo

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Next up is pretty much just more detail added. I defined the leg muscles better, but am not sure whether to keep them so "cut" or not. The forearms and lower legs will have the spikey "scutes" detail added and won't really have a humanoid shape... which I forgot about until AFTER I started forming them as such. It gives me an idea of proportion anyway. The trick will be the rest of the turtle/tortoise "skin". Check out the reference images to see the saggy skin. I want to utilize this look to hide some of the joints like where the butt-cheeks separate from the upper legs.






And here's the sculpting progress. So far just using various styluses and my fingers. Soon I'll start using brushes and alcohol or odorless turpenoid to smooth and texture it.



« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 11:58:25 AM by FichtenFoo »