Author Topic: 1/72 Destroid Tomahawk  (Read 19129 times)

May 08, 2011, 09:30:52 PM
Read 19129 times

Atlas100

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At end January this year, I got this Tomahawk kit as a gift. I was really thrilled to receive it as I got strong attachment to the Destroid, mainly from playing Battletech, and Robotech RPG from my young days, and watching Macross series of course. It prompted me to start building the kit asap after a few years since my first completed kit. The Tomahawk project started on the 2nd week of Feb 2011.



The kit looks like a well-detailed HG kit. My initial idea was to mount the Tomahawk on a scenic base but looking at the progress to date, having to work on the kit 3-6 hrs everyday (except weekends), I guess what I want now is just to simply finish the project as I am kind of burnt out...

PRE-ASSEMBLY

Well, this first stage is rather straightforward, cutting parts from sprues and put them together. Most importantly I checked for seams on parts which are visible after finished assembling the kit. I also looked out for parts which can be glued together and paint them as a whole. After pre-assembly, I posed the Tomahawk and made battle-damage to certain sections.

The Arms

I think that people who work on this kit will appreciate that the cannon barrel on each arm is seamless. However, the cannon barrels do not have a bore. The kit provides black round decals to simulate the cannons’ bores. I thought that it might look fake with the decals and decided not to use them. Instead, I drilled holes to make an actual bore in the barrels.





I have also drilled holes at the back of the cannons (i.e. at the “elbows”). They look more proper as some kind of “exhausts” for the cannons. The surface of the newly drilled holes was very rough. I put double-sided tape on a stick and attached a short length of sandpaper to it. The sandpaper was then rolled around the stick and inserted into the holes. The stick was manually rotated to sand the hole for a smoother surface. I found that I could not really smoothen out the surface effectively as the drilling had caused some deep scars that could not be easily sanded out. I decided to use Mr Surfacer 500 and applied them thickly to the surface of the bore. Once the paint was dried overnight, I used the same method again to sand the surface. The end result is much better.



I also used 3mm diameter discs from Kotobukiya and drilled right through them, leaving only the flange as a tiny ring. I then used extra thin cement to glue them on the “elbows”. After drying, I continued to drill through the rings right into the elbows. This aims to create additional detail with a sense of depth when you look into the cannon’s exhaust.






May 08, 2011, 11:05:50 PM
Reply #1

Atlas100

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The Lower Torso

The lower torso is generally made up of two halves, front half and back half. There are a few pieces here which are hollow. I reckoned that these hollow-out areas are not really visible (unless you scrutinise up close or at certain upskirt angles) when the legs are fully attached to the lower torso. However, I felt rather uncomfortable about it and eventually decided to fill them up. I used Tamiya Epoxy Putty to fill up the hollowed areas. Once it was cured, I proceeded to sand it smooth. One thing I really regretted was to glue the ball joints permanently to the lower torso before I filled up the hollow parts. The ball joints were obstructions and created much difficulty to do a proper sanding. The sanding really took a while and generated some frustrations when I couldn’t get a nice surface. I had to use Mr Surfacer 500 and epoxy putty for further patching and corrections caused by poor angle of sanding, and I did this for a few rounds before getting it right.







For the back of the lower torso (which I happily called it the Butt), instead of using epoxy putty, I decided to simply cut out a few pieces of Tamiya 0.5mm pla-plate to cover up the hollow areas. Not that straightforward as I needed to cover the hollow areas in several facets. Any gaps and uneven surfaces were filled with Mr White Putty. The surfaces were then sanded smooth after the putty was cured.








May 08, 2011, 11:13:16 PM
Reply #2

Atlas100

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The Shoulder Lamp



The shoulder lamp was a headache. It consisted of a piece of clear lens and a backing (which is to be painted silver) to be contained within two halves of the lamp casing. I could have done up the silver paint first and then glued the two halves of the lamp casing together. However, I avoided this method: One, once the two halves are glued together, the glue might stain the lens and sanding of the seams might scratch it. Two, I need to mask the lens before painting the outer casing. There is a risk of poor masking and paint leaking onto the lens. Three, I like to organise my airbrushing for big batches of parts if possible. This is because I do my airbrushing outdoor due to the kids at home, and need to setup my painting station (i.e. carry the table out, carry out the boxes of paints and bottles of thinners, bring out the chair and compressor, setup the airbrush, ready the trash bin, lay the old newspapers over the table, etc etc etc) for each and every painting session. So, airbushing a single part in a single painting session before continuing with gluing and other stuff is not ready efficient for me.

After pondering over this for many days, I decided to totally remove the interior of the casing before gluing them together. I could then simply slide in the lens and silver backing from the back of the casing to the front. To use a hobby knife to remove the casing interior is very tedious, hazardous (finger cut) and not really effective. This gave me a good excuse to purchase a rotary tool, something which I always wanted to buy. After doing some research, I eventually purchased a Proxxon Micromot 50/E. It does wonders.



I used the rotary tool to remove the interior entirely, and then glued and sanded both halves of the lamp casing. I realised later that the lamp casing simply hung loosely from the shoulder support.



As such, I quickly cut a few pieces of 0.5mm pla-plate, glued and layered them together. A tight-fitting hole was drilled through it. I planned to glue the piece within the casing (after the casing and silver backing were painted and the latter slid into the casing with lens) to hold the lamp to the shoulder support. We will see how effective it is later.


May 08, 2011, 11:24:05 PM
Reply #3

Atlas100

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Top-Mounted Shoulder Missile Box



The assembly is not a problem at all, but just to mention here that the inner side of each missile cover needs to be sanded smooth. The difficulty was that each part is very small and the inner surfaces are concave. Kind of frustrating to do the sanding. I tried to tape a small strip of sandpaper on the flat end of a small drill bit or metal pin and slowly rub the end into the surface to sand it. Tough.


May 08, 2011, 11:50:04 PM
Reply #4

Atlas100

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The Guns

The machine guns mounted on the head and both sides of the torso are moulded with little potholes along the barrels. Nice, but I felt that the potholes are too shallow for panel lining later. So, I decided to make deeper holes in place of the shallow potholes. I poked the potholes (and sometimes my fingers) with a sharp sewing needle and realised that the resultant holes were not evenly sized or rounded. I looked into my Proxxon kit and found a nice tiny 0.5mm drill bit. This really created nice even holes along the gun barrels. And of course I used a pin vise, not the rotary tool, for the drilling.




May 09, 2011, 04:27:17 PM
Reply #5

The Magic Tuba Pixie

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Wow.  Looks like you're really being thorough with this.  That's great.
I have to agree with you; the drilled machine gun barrel looks much better than the poked one does.


This'll be a tight model, once completed!  What did you have in mind for the color scheme?
I do other things, too.

May 09, 2011, 11:03:38 PM
Reply #6

Atlas100

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Hi Pixie. Thanks for reading. I am painting the Tomahawk at the moment. The colour is a very light khaki. I will post more on that later.

May 09, 2011, 11:13:55 PM
Reply #7

Atlas100

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The Upper Torso



I really messed this up. The upper torso consists of two halves, an interior part and a front piece (A6). During pre-assembly, after the parts were fitted together, I found that A6 could be removed/attached without any problem, or at least this was what I experienced at that time. As I fancied that I could paint A6 in different colour from the main body later, I decided to glue all parts together but kept A6 separated.



After gluing and sanding, to my horror, I found A6 could not be fitted into the upper torso. This was because the upper torso is tapered toward the front. I made a simple diagram below to illustrate this.



After trying in vain to squeeze in A6 for the fit, I gave up in fear of damaging the upper torso. Finally, given no other choices, I filed both sides of A6 to narrow it. It fitted into the upper torso eventually, but there were ugly gaps at both sides of A6.



Frantically, I tried Mr White putty and epoxy putty for filling and attempted to sculpt back the edges and corners. Even when they were cured, Mr White putty and epoxy putty are still considerably soft and crumbled easily when I tried to file them into shape. I did this for few rounds and gave up. In the internet, I read about Tamiya Polyester Putty and decided to give it a try. This stuff is wonderful and I got the thing done finally.

May 09, 2011, 11:44:07 PM
Reply #8

Atlas100

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The Fragiles

The following parts are thin and very fragile, which I like to take this chance to highlight them, in case you are working or intending to work on the kit.

Antenna
Very thin piece indeed.



The bad thing about it was that the antenna was attached to the sprue along its mid-length. Extreme care was taken when cutting it from the sprue. Unfortunately, I accidentally broke it when I tried to sand away the excess material at its mid-length. It just snapped into half effortlessly! I glued it back using extra thin cement, and once it was dried, I tried to sand it off again, using the minimum of minimal strength while holding my breath. It worked.


Thigh plates

The thigh plates are rather thin. After pre-assembly, I tried to peel them off from the legs carefully. Unfortunately the thin plastic bent at the weak point (circled area), turned whitish and cracks could be seen. I coated the areas with extra thin cement to strengthen it.



May 10, 2011, 12:22:43 AM
Reply #9

Atlas100

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Colour Scheme

The manual in the kit does not have any line art, so I went to sarna.net to get a pic of the 70tons Warhammer (which is really the Tomahawk in Macross) and experimented with colours. My initial intention was to have a colour scheme that is military, something like greyish blue/green. I had decided on one of the schemes shown here and had even bought the paints.



However, I got reluctant at the last minute, wondering whether this is the look that I really wanted. I backed out and decided to work further on the colour. This time, I used the photos from the Tomahawk cover box and tweaked them to get a visual that would be closer to what I thought will be the final result. I decided to get a light khaki for urban battles. To make the thing pops, I injected orange and brown into the whole idea, particularly the shoulder missile pods and the feet. I like the original white decals on the sides of the legs, so I decided to place strips of white on various part of the body (i.e the head, shoulders, arm cannons, collar) to tie the patterns together and aim to infuse dynamics on the Tomahawk. The shoulder missiles would be orangey-flesh. The top mounted missiles would be bright deep orange. I named this custom of mine the “Destroid March” or “D3” (for a reason).





I also experimented with various colours for the triplet-stripes on the arm cannons, yellow, brown etc. However, I stick to the original black as it makes the cannons look heavier.



May 12, 2011, 11:00:59 AM
Reply #10

braxat2000

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Wow you've done much better modelling job than me...
I'm working on this model right now, and built it straight out of the box.

I did try to use their decals, and they just disintigrated when I tried to remove them from the decal sheet. I would be interested to hear if it is my fault or the decals themselves. I didn't have any problems with the replacement decals I used though.

Anyway fantastic job, I can't wait to see the final result.
Eyal.

May 12, 2011, 12:59:19 PM
Reply #11

ZLuca

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Great WIP.
Very professional, fun to follow it!
Great job
Luca


May 14, 2011, 03:18:30 AM
Reply #12

Bhm

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Excellent WIP and a nice read!

A tip for the coloring on the tips of the barrels: How about doing like the nazis in WWII? Stripes were added to the barrels for each tank kill. Could be a nice detail to your model.
(note: kill rings were mostly used for propaganda pics and the promptly removed. Having killrings on your barrel when being captured increased the odds of you ending up in a ditch en route to the POW-camp :) ).

May 14, 2011, 04:36:01 AM
Reply #13

nico

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May be one of the best wip ever seen on this forum. Very interesting.

May 14, 2011, 08:21:41 AM
Reply #14

Joa

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May be one of the best wip ever seen on this forum. Very interesting.

+1

very instructive and explaining...

May 14, 2011, 10:46:00 AM
Reply #15

ZLuca

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May 15, 2011, 08:44:31 PM
Reply #16

Atlas100

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Hi Joa / ZLuca.

Thanks for the pluses; it is a pleasant surprise as I did not expect that.

Final Fantasy level up music pls  ^_^


May 15, 2011, 09:03:16 PM
Reply #17

Atlas100

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Hi Braxat2000 / Nico / Bhm.

Thanks for your comments.

I did try to use their decals, and they just disintigrated when I tried to remove them from the decal sheet.

On the contrary, I found that the decals from this kit are rather thick and tough. When I soaked them in water, it took almost a minute for each to be loosened from its paper backing. I have completed the decals and will post them here soon.


How about doing like the nazis in WWII? Stripes were added to the barrels for each tank kill. Could be a nice detail to your model.

Thanks for the suggestion. The barrels are long and suitable for different camo patterns, decals and/or decos. I have already finished painting the barrels and currently clear coating them.

May 18, 2011, 06:28:50 PM
Reply #18

Atlas100

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PAINTING

All parts were given a primer base using Mr Surfacer 1200 before they were airbrushed with the appropriate custom colours. Occasionally, the painted surfaces would turn out rather rough due to poor airbrushing and dusty/windy environment (I airbrushed outdoors as mentioned earlier. Try being harassed by flying insects during airbrushing; I found out they really like the smell of the thinner, until they tasted the wrath of my shiny gundanium alloy Sparmax DH103). For that, I used sandpaper grid 1200 or 1000 to smoothen any rough painted surface before airbrushing it again. I used very light pressure to sand the rough surfaces to prevent removal of too much paint.

For surfaces to be coated with metallic paints, I leave them to the very last step to avoid contaminating subsequent paints with metallic residue. I only got one airbrush.

Custom Colours

Most of the parts were airbrushed with Mr Colour Light Brown as a preshade, followed by a light khaki mix.



Paints and thinners from Gaia color and Mr Color can be mixed together.

(Note: Percentages of mixtures provided in this article are just estimations. During actual mixing, I picked up individual pot of paint from the selection every now and then and added it into the mixture until I thought that it looked close to the planned concept. No accurate measurement of paint proportions was carried out at anytime. The percentages provided here are just a guide to give readers a feel of what the mixture were consist of.)

After I airbrushed the khaki, I observed that it was rather light in colour. In order to prevent white decals/surfaces from drowning in it, I decided to apply filter to increase the khaki contrast. Oil paint was used as filter. The following were the oil paints used for the project.



Before the filter was applied, the respective parts were airbrushed with a flat coat. I used Brown Ochre oil paint for the filter. I made sure that the oil paint was very thin so as to make sure the resultant khaki did not turn out too dark. The filter was applied evenly on the surfaces to prevent it from drying in ugly patches.

I applied two layers of Brown Ochre filters to get the desired tone.



On several surfaces, I also deliberately brushed the filter to form subtle vertical streaks to represent light weathering. However I noticed that these weathering streaks almost faded when I applied gloss coat later to prepare the surfaces for decaling. The gloss coat, mixed with Mr Color Thinner, could be too heavy in one application during airbrushing and it thinned out the oil streaks when the surfaces were soaked. (Note: Weathering is normally done after decaling. In this case, although I did the subtle weathering streaks before decaling, the streaks are not on surfaces where the decals will be placed on.)



(Hint: To see the streaks clearer, zoom the picture in and out continuously)

The following are the type of flat and gloss (clear) used.

« Last Edit: May 18, 2011, 07:10:40 PM by Atlas100 »

May 18, 2011, 08:27:40 PM
Reply #19

Atlas100

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As most of the parts are the monotonous khakis, it was a good break-away to paint the feet and shoulder missile covers.





I was very curious to experiment a filter with Rowney Golden Yellow on the missile covers, and so I did. The resultant colour on the missile covers is a richer yellow. Result is nothing dramatic, but I supposed it will do.




Internal surfaces such as bores and exhaust were painted with grey.



There are two methods to paint the internal surfaces. Method One, after the external surfaces were painted, these were masked with Tamiya Masking Tape before the internal surfaces were airbrushed.









Method Two, airbrush the internal surfaces with grey first, then use blu-tack to fill them up before airbrushing the external surfaces with the respective colours.