Author Topic: Sanding Gundam Figure Problem  (Read 2389 times)

kenickie

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Sanding Gundam Figure Problem
« on: August 20, 2005, 08:08:27 AM »
I've been looking everywhere on the net for the answer to this question.

I am currently working on the figure that came with the gundam wing 1/100. I'm trying to sand down the edges but the sandpaper seems to rip the figure material. It's acuatlly shredding giving that fluffy look. I'm using a very fine sand paper for this.

I'm using this http://www.codyscoop.com/ht-seams.html as a guideline.

FichtenFoo

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Sanding Gundam Figure Problem
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2005, 08:21:23 AM »
That's because he's working with resin while you're woring with crap poly-cap material. You're just not going to be anle to sand that very will. Your best bet is to try to carve/slice off the crap with a sharp xacto blade.

I wager you didn't search very well however since he also has a turorial on working with those types of figures:

http://codyscoop.com/ht-mgfigures.html

 :wink:
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nathaniel

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Sanding Gundam Figure Problem
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2005, 04:56:58 PM »
The figure sounds like it's made of polyethelene.  It's the same stuff that lots of 1/72 historical figures are made about.  A few steps need to be taken to make things work right with this material.

Wash it.  With soap and warm water.  Like you would wash an infant's hands.

Slice away the mould lines or find an alternative method.  I use a very fine burr tip in a rotary tool that I can reduce to a few rpms-- most dremels go too quickly.  I used to use a metal staple in a cork heated over a candle flame.  I generally slice off the big parts and clean it up with either the rotary burr or the staple.

Prime with an actual primer.  For these type of figures, I use Krylon primer.  Most automotive primers should work fine.

Paint with flexible paints.  Acrylics are best.  The plastic will always be slightly bendy, so it's good if the paint flexes with it.

Seal it with a flexible sealer.  Krylon's matte is latex based and stays semi-flexible.  So does most polyurethane based spray sealers.

You can get great results on figures made of this material.  An example (not mine):

http://www.baueda.com/plastikornar/painting_guide.html