Author Topic: Suggestion to mix up pearly purple  (Read 1783 times)

September 23, 2007, 05:56:34 AM
Read 1783 times

T1000

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I am trying to think of a way to mix a paint which represents a pearly purple (EVA-01). Here are some possible ways I am considering

1. Mix 67 purple with white pearl
2. Mix red pearl with blue pearl
3. Mix Clear Red with clear blue to get clear purple, then paint over white pearl : tried, gets a very dark blue/violet! Will try to dilute them before mixing next time.

Any suggestions? I want to achieve a pearly colour like that of EVA-01 purple!!  :P

September 23, 2007, 11:01:03 PM
Reply #1

DrDazzle

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Well if you are going with the anime, the EVA Unit 01 isn't pearly purple... it is just purple.

But as for making it pearly, I blieve SOMEWHERE in their pantheon of colors, Tamiya makes a Pearlescent Clear Coat spray. I have a Dengeki Hobby mag with a section featuring some MG Quebelies (SP?) and one used Pearlescent colors and I believe they had a clear coat for it.

September 29, 2007, 05:56:42 PM
Reply #2

spiffitz

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You can try an auto paint store for pearl powders but you'll get a bottle that'll last you three lifetimes. A manicure shop might be able to help you with small quantities. eBay is also a good source of pearl powders if you're up for that.

There's a car modeling place that sells pearls but the name escapes me at the moment. I'd stay away from those as most of them buy cheap stuff, i.e. nail supplies, then re-sell them as marked-up "modeling supplies".

For your application I would paint regular purple, and over that a clear coat with the purple pearl powder mixed in. A contrasting base color gives you a color-changing effect. For example a black base with purple powder/clear coat will look black or purple depending on the viewing angle. You don't need much powder - usually a "scoop" using a flat toothpick end is enough for a typical airbrush jar.


Ron