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Author Topic: How To Build a Master Grade Kit  (Read 15828 times)
FichtenFoo
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« on: July 29, 2005, 04:32:07 PM »

That's right folks and newbies... no more asking for building basics! I made a HUGE tutorial on how to build MGs. The techniques within also apply to other modeling subjects and kits, but the focus is on MGs. Take a look and let me know if I missed anything or if anything could be expanded upon. I'm a little burned on it though right now. It was a lot of work.

It's mostly on how *I* do things, but if anyone has anything technique-wise that they'd like to add, please post it here and it'll be considered. Could make for a nice resource and a question-buffer. :wink:

Click here for the tutorial on modeling basics »

Tet, do you mind if I use those images I made for your seminar?
« Last Edit: May 13, 2009, 06:17:01 AM by FichtenFoo » Logged

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gamerabaenre
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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2005, 04:51:49 PM »

Excellent FF.  Reminds me that I should go back through my own tutorials and update and merge things from my progress pages.  Good stuff.  I now have a link to post when noobs ask silly how to questions.
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Garoad
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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2005, 06:28:02 PM »

This Tutorial is pretty helpful. I wish you made it earlier! I'm on my first MG kit right now and im 50% through and today I already broke part of it!!! ahh!! Its a GP01 and I broke the part that connects the mid torse to the rest of the core fighter, the core fighter is a real b!tch!! I have no glue right now so I want to order some. I'm really scared when ordering off the internet since I dont have acess to a credit card, how old do you have to be to get a Money Order?
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nico
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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2005, 04:47:01 AM »

Waou great job   :shock:

Nico
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FichtenFoo
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2005, 09:12:19 AM »

Quote from: "gamerabaenre"
Excellent FF.  Reminds me that I should go back through my own tutorials and update and merge things from my progress pages.  Good stuff.  I now have a link to post when noobs ask silly how to questions.


Thanks! Feel free to direct newbs to it. My main motivation was the influx of "can someone post/answer various modeling tutorials?" questions. Hopefully this buffers that.

I finally had enough stored images to make this a not-so-daunting task. I only had to take 10-12 more pics to post it up. I still need to take decal placement images, but will take those when I decal my Strike.

Garoad: Not sure how old you need to be.

Nico: thanks... I'll answer your e-mail in a bit.
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Bannock Cullen
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« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2005, 11:08:54 AM »

Thx much Fich.  Thats probably the best general tutorial that I've found yet.  I finally have the time and agreeable weather to come out of modeler's retirement, so when I get the hang of my new HP-BC, this will be a great deal of help.
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FichtenFoo
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2005, 11:15:24 AM »

Thanks!

I just updated it with rescribing panel lines and pin-vise holes as well as pics I forgot to add.
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Ezechiel
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2005, 03:37:11 PM »

Thanks a lot, it will be very usefull for people new to the hobby! Thank you for taking the time to do it!
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maxwinamp
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« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2005, 06:28:18 PM »

WOW!
Thanks for the effort FichtenFoo!
GREAT Tutorial for the newbie.
NOW I know where to direct the newbie to for ALL their questions!! Tongue

Really admire your commitment to the modelling community. :)
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nico
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« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2005, 04:33:37 AM »

Mike

You want a tip to remove paint from your kit easilly ? even plated paints as on the Hyaku Shiki. It's very easy. You just have to put the pieces into oven cleaner foam. You know this product made to remove grease in oven or on any greasy places in the kitchen.
Spray the foam onto pieces and let them "swiming" during a couple of hours then rinse them with clear water. If all the paint is not gone use the  scraping face of a sponge.

Another tip for resine kit or 1/144 modelers . You often have to mask areas  to paint different colors on the same on piece. For exemple you have an ecuson on the shoulder or something really hard to mask. Just put masking tape on the area you want to mask. Then take a drawing pencil and gently pass by (don't no if it's correct to say pass by) on the panel lines. You will see the negative of your area. The panels are still clear and the rest in darkned by the pencil. Now take a Excacto or something with a fine and very sharp blade to cut the wasted tape and remove it using panels as a guide.
Ok ok it's very hard for me to explane this in english so be lenient.

And a last one for resine kit modelers. When you want to assemble to parts most of the time your are using a metalic stem to reinfoce the link between the piece. Sometimes therse are little gaps ready to be bored but sometimes there is nothing. So when ther is nothing I juste drop a little drip of red paint on the piece then I pre assemble the two piece. I seperate them and the drip let a mark on the over piece easy but efficiant.

Well that's it. Hope you anderstood everything  :cry:

Nico
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Mrex-sgundam
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« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2005, 06:09:48 AM »

Wow! very good tutorial FF
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FichtenFoo
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« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2005, 04:29:53 PM »

I updated the tutorial with Nico's masking tip and Fulcy's decal article link. I also added a contributors section to thank everyone that's helped with the tutorial.
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« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2005, 07:18:17 PM »

That's a really nice tut, FF...thanks to you and all who contributed.  Thanks for keeping up the "good" work of taking care of us!  LOL!

I know there will be lots who use this guide, just to see how the Grand Poobah of Plastics does it himself!

I know you hate that...but I had to tease you a litte bit!   LOL  LOL

Take care,
Taz
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Ezechiel
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« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2005, 05:20:11 AM »

http://www.clubhyper.com/reference/rescribingda_1.htm
Here's a link about rescribing panel lines. I found it clear enough so you may find it useful.
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FichtenFoo
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« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2005, 06:23:33 AM »

Quote from: "Ezechiel"
http://www.clubhyper.com/reference/rescribingda_1.htm
Here's a link about rescribing panel lines. I found it clear enough so you may find it useful.


Great article. I remember seeing that before. I posted it up and added you to the contributors. Thanks!

I need some assistance!


I should to an "I F---ed up" section as well.

 Does anyone want to do a short write-up on stripping various types of paint? Alcohol for Tamiya, Easy off for enamels, whatever for lacquers???, etc... Or anything else that might be associated with F---ing up like losing parts and such. I'll  use Phils R10 post for the losing part...
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nico
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« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2005, 10:01:34 AM »

Well I did an article dealing with paints last year. But it is in french so I should translate it  :cry:  I will try to translate it. I think you will have to add corrections.

Here is the first paragraph :

The different kind of paints

1.1 Acrylics

Acrylics paint is very usefull for modelling. It dries  very fast (between 10 to 20 minutes depends on markers) some as Life Colors are non toxic. You can easilly thin them with different kind of puducts like water, distiled water, alcool or specific acrylic thinners. The pigmenyts are very thin and you can get a a rigid or “elastic” coat (depends on makers).
The advantage given by a fast drying process can also become a problem. As it dries faster it is more difficult to paint perfect shade effects. Another main disavantage of acrylics is thatthey are fragile so beware of friction or chocs.
Main acrylics markers are Tamiya, Gunze-Sangyô, Citadel, Prince August, Revell.    

Let me know your feeling

bye

Nico
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Cecil
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« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2005, 09:48:38 PM »

Michael,

First of all, great tutorial. It really clears out a lot of guess-work and sheds light on new techniques for virgin model-builders and intermediates alike. Secondly, I have two questions regarding your MG Building Tutorial:

In your section titled "Following the instructions", the last bullet point says "See images below. Internals were painted, then armor was applied, seam fixed, then internals were masked and armor painted." When you fixed the seam, did you glue the two halves of the armor together? Do you (or anyone else for that matter) have any tips on fixing seams and painting, yet still retaining the ability of removing the armor off the internal structure?

In your sesction titled "Final assembly", could you provide some examples of parts where you would apply that dab of white glue to the cut male pegs? Alright, I perused some of your in-progress build pages and notice that you pretty much paint all your parts individually before assembling them together in what I would consider being "sub-assemblies". With this in mind, it makes sense that you would use the white glue for your final assembly. See, I was under the impression that most (if not all) of the non-moveable parts making up sub-assemblies (i.e. foot, calf, thigh, waist/hip, upper torso, etc.) would have already been cemented together prior to the painting process, and therefore leaving final assembly to consist of putting sub-assemblies in their repsective poly cap locations (i.e. thigh to hip joint, head to neck, etc.).  Could you go through your thought process of painting what I would call "micro-assemblies"/individual pieces first then assembling them in this manner? Is it to avoid having to do copious amounts of masking, or does it go beyond that?

Thank you very much for your time and committment to the hobby.
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FichtenFoo
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« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2005, 05:47:26 AM »

Thanks Cecil, and thanks for the well thought out post as well!

Quote
In your section titled "Following the instructions", the last bullet point says "See images below. Internals were painted, then armor was applied, seam fixed, then internals were masked and armor painted." When you fixed the seam, did you glue the two halves of the armor together? Do you (or anyone else for that matter) have any tips on fixing seams and painting, yet still retaining the ability of removing the armor off the internal structure?


No, gluing was necessary to remove the seam. The only way you'll be able to make the armor removable after fixing seams is to do some heavy modifications. You'll need to cut across existing panel lines and such and make new panels and attachment points meanwhile gluing seams together that need fixed elsewhere. It's a lot of work with little benefit unless you want to display your internals. I never remove the armor panels when done, so gluing them shut is no problem.

Quote
Could you go through your thought process of painting what I would call "micro-assemblies"/individual pieces first then assembling them in this manner? Is it to avoid having to do copious amounts of masking, or does it go beyond that?


It's pretty much just to avoid masking. If something can be built after painting, then why put it toggether first and make more work for yourself? Some things can't, and those are the only parts I'll build first. I'm all about making it easier on myself. :wink:
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nico
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« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2005, 11:11:18 AM »

Hi Mike,

I did an article dealing with paint. It's almost completed. I will send it to you as soon as possible.

Nico
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FichtenFoo
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« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2005, 11:16:05 AM »

Cool... I read that first paragraph and there's a few things that need fixed I think, and a little translation fixes, but it should be good when it's done.

I had some people e-mail me askign about thinning other acrylics with alcohol. Apparently some of the brands other than Tamiya get gunky and clog the airbrush  when mixed with alcohol. I think it was the gunze or the modelmaster. (if MM makes acrylics, I'm not sure.)

Edit: as for the shade effect issues, I haven't had any. I think it's all in how you thin it. Thinner paint gradates better.
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