Author Topic: Tits McGee - Galaxy Girl!!  (Read 7000 times)

FilmMkr

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Tits McGee - Galaxy Girl!!
« on: June 03, 2007, 08:33:10 AM »
Alright you giant robot fans, don't say I didn't warn you!  Here is a build thread for *GASP!!* a scantily-clad babe with a ray gun!   :razz:  :razz:

One of the gems I found at WonderFest USA this year was this original sculpt by Japanese sculptor Yoshinore Yatake of Accel HP.  The sculpt is called "Original Character #3 Future Girl".  Yatake-san was there in person and brought several gorgeous kits along.  Here she is on display at Yatake-san's table - I am going to stick pretty close to this rendering, as I really dig the pearlescent hair and jumper.





I was fortunate enough to score one of these originals before they sold out (yet another reason to grab an Early Bird pass!).  The kit is 1/6 scale and cost $100.



After an overnight bath in Lake Castrol I gave her a rough cleanup with sandpaper, nail blocks, and sanding foam, then began the intial cleanup and seam removal.  As I've mentioned in other threads, I always remove any contaminants and mold release before I do any cleanup.  The reason for this is that even though your model appears solid, the resin is actually very porous.  Mold release is a silicon-based compound, and if you sand the resin before you remove the mold release, you will grind the silicone down into the pores of the resin.  This can give you all sorts of headaches down the line, particularly when you pull off your masking, only to discover to your horror that your gorgeous skin tone comes up with the tape.  Yikes!

I then hit her with a coat of my favorite gray primer.  I use gray because it is really easy to see any remaining seams and chingaderras that need cleanup.  This is the primer I use - it is a self-etching primer that I get at my local paint jobber and is prob'ly overkill for the kind of models we build.  I use self-etching primer because I build multimedia car kits that include lots of white metal and photoetched bits and other primers tend to lift off of metal parts.  I've found that I never have any problems with paint lift from resin since I discovered this stuff about three years ago.  It is very expensive and most of you will never need an industrial strength basecoat like this.  I just thought I'd show you what I use.




Anyway, after the first coat of primer I started the cleanup, using sandpaper, nail blocks (get 'em at beauty supply stores), and sanding foam.  I buy faom pads in large sheets and cut 'em up into smaller pads.  It takes me hours to clean up my kits.  This model was an excellent cast, but it still took me about six hours to clean it up.  I know guys who can clean up a kit in an hour, but I treat each separate part as if it is a complete model in and of itself.  If you pay this kind of attention to each and every individual part, the finished product will be the highest quality you can make it.





In these pictures you can see several issues that I will address as I go along, including re-scribing the areas where her jumper and boots meet her skin.  Notice how I blended the cleaned-up seams into the surrounding areas, feathering the primer back into the raw resin.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2007, 03:19:51 PM by FilmMkr »

FilmMkr

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2007, 08:34:15 AM »
Here are the other parts after the initial cleanup.  I washed everything with SoftScrub and my trusty big-ass purple toothbrush and set them on lint-free paper towels overnight to air dry.  Now I'll hit them with another light coat of primer and look for any imperfections that I might have missed.






Her ray gun has some intricate detail, so I was extremely careful when removing seams and flash.  I really took my time here so that I wouldn't remove too much resin.  I do NOT want to have to rescuplt anything - I wanna start slingin' paint this afternoon!  :D



Her lovely face.  Note the gorgeous sculpting here:




Again, I had to be really careful in and around her ears and neck.  There appears to be a spot I missed on her neck.  We'll hit it with primer and see if it still shows.  Better to take our time than rush it and f*ck it up!



Hair is always a pain in the a** to clean up.  It is boring and tedious, but I cannot tell you how many "finished" kits i've seen posted on the boards with sloppy cleanup on the hair!




Okay, lets hit her with a second coat of primer and see where we stand.

FilmMkr

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2007, 10:40:51 AM »
After making a few minor tweaks, I laid down a couple of light coats of Tamiya Fine White primer.  Ordinarily I wouldn't use this intermediate step, but I since I really want the colors to pop, AND because I am going to use pearl powders to enhance the paint on her jumper, boots, and hair, I base coated everything with white primer.  You could also use paint, but the Tamiya primer has a much finer grain.



After doing a test fit to make sure everything is still where I want it, I found a couple of tiny flaws.  Here you can see that the hair/headband area still needs some attention:



And here is a minor step under the shoulder of her jumper:



Even though I got most of the surface stuff, this fit check showed me that I needed to give the underside of the join - which one would normally assume would be hidden - some love.  Note that the other shoulder was not as prominent:



I have recently been using the macro setting on my Nikon D2H's 28-105 lens as a back-check to discover any imperfections.  I always model with an Optivisor, but even then I can't see every single flaw.  I noticed that when I did closeup photography of my finished kits I was always discovering gotchas, so I now use it to find 'em before I paint 'em!   :twitch:



Goremageddon

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2007, 02:02:00 AM »
That hair made my eyes go like... :twitch: :twitch: :twitch: :twitch: :twitch: :twitch: :twitch: :twitch:... Are you going to try that blond?. And you´re such a perfectionist...Which is excelent...I already knew your work...So...I love your style FilmMkr..





By the way, your avatar is HOT HOT HOT. :embarrased:
« Last Edit: June 04, 2007, 06:55:30 AM by Goremageddon »
ainting and more painting...I wanna be a painter...

Francesco Benedettini

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2007, 04:08:08 AM »
"Constructive Criticism" rule force me to be quiet but... I have to express my personal pleasure I feel when I see your photos.
I see they are directly form your workbench, but they seem so "professional" to me.

About the model, I'm not a figure painter but I hope your skin tone will be less pinky than the the Yatake-san's one.

Bye  :-)
"EXPERIMENT WITH ENTHUSIASM"
-Boys play with Gundam... Men make Ma.K-
>> www.patopazzo.com <<

FilmMkr

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2007, 07:29:28 AM »
Okay, after a week of intense production work at my studio and Space Center Houston, I am finally back at my bench.  Yay!

A short update, then I have to go to a funeral for my best friend's mom.  :rip:

I will be primarily using Freestyle Lifetones paints for this build.  Here are the colors i used for the skintone base:



The first thing I did was pre-shade the areas around where her clothing would meet her exposed flesh  with Transparent Flesh - around the tops of her shoulders, around her breasts, and around her jumper and boots.  I then basecoated the kit with a mixture of KB Flesh and Pale Flesh from a distance of about eight inches, just misting the exposed body parts.  After letting the first pass dry, I went back over everything with another light coat.

I added just a bit of Virgin Flesh to the basecoat color and hit the central areas of her face, arms, legs, breasts, and that shapely bottom.



I lightened the base color once again with more Virgin Flesh color, then airbrushed highlights on her forehead, the tops of her cheekbones, nose, ears, the top of her breasts and shoulders - anywhere that would reflect light.








The final step in basecoating the skin tones was lightly misting the original base from a distance of about ten inches to tie everything together.






Next up: shading with pastels.  (I'll work on that when I get home from the funeral later this afternoon.)

Filmy


FichtenFoo

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2007, 02:22:48 PM »
Looks nice so far. The body sculpt is refreshingly realistic compared to the typical lanky boobular anime gks. That's the first I've heard of the Freestyle Lifetones paints. Are they for airbrushing only?
Rust is beautiful.

FilmMkr

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2007, 03:22:31 PM »
Quote
That's the first I've heard of the Freestyle Lifetones paints. Are they for airbrushing only?

Yes - they are pre-thinned and ready for use in an airbrush, but I suppose you could hand brush them as well.  I don't see whay not.  There are 100 colors available, with lots of transparents available that are awesome for blending.  They were originally developed for taxidermists, but Barb and Dan Jorgenson over at Kitbuilders package and market them through their Website.

On with the WIP!

I know that most of you guys are advanced and experienced modelers and already know all of this stuff, but please bear with me.  Those of you who are familiar with my WIPs know I go into some pretty detailed explanations of techniques you have already mastered.  I'm doing this in the hope that it will help the newbies that come to romp in our playhouse, but if you'd prefer that I skip all of the detail and just post the finished pix, then by all means please say so and I'll quit wasting so much bandwidth!

I also know that most of you guys prefer robots over girls, but that's a subject for a different day!   :razz:  :razz:  :razz:

The point is that modeling is modeling, and a lot of the techniques that I use on cars and babes can also be used on your robots, so I hope that you can get something from my boring buildups of semi-naked girlies.

I shade my kits using several different methods - the pre-shading technique mentioned above, oil washes and glazes, airbrushing after the skintone is applied, and my favorite technique, shading with pastels.  Note that you must use CHALK pastels and NOT oil pastels.  Chalk will stick - oil will not.

I've used a number of different pastels over the years, but the best I've found are Faber Castell.  They're moderatly hard to chase down, but you can find 'em at most good-sized art supply stores or at Dick Blick on the interweb. 

Take a small sheet of sandpaper and rub some of the pastels into a pile.  One of the beauties of using pastels is that you can mix them.  Here I've taken a sienna color and mixed it with an orangy-peach.




Take a fairly stiff brush - I use Micromark's fabulous dry brushes (also available on the interweb) - and mix your color, the gently tap the pastel in the area you want to shade:




In the photo above it looks kinda messy.  That's okay - just dab the pastels (don't rub!!) into the areas that would normally be in shadow or have less light hitting them.  Hold your arm out and look at how light plays off of the shallows and folds and crevices.  After tapping color into the area, gently blow the excess away.  Swallow your spit and lick your lips dry first or you'll blow tiny globs of spit onto your lovely work and screw it up (experience talking here!)

Take a slightly softer brush (I dab with a #2 and blend with a #4), blend the pastel away from the areas where the shading is the greatest and blend it into the skin tone.  Don't worry if it doesn't look just perfect right away - take your time and build it yup over several applications.  I've seen a lot of sh*tty shading jobs where the modeler tried to do it all on the first pass.  Patience!!




As a matter of preference, I like to add a light shading around the line where the skin meets the clothing.  Here I brush away from her jumper, blending back into the skintone:




Models are three dimensional representations, but sometimes a little extra attention can add even more depth and dimension.  Here I use pastels to define the musculature on her arms.  I really dig a babe with defined shoulders, so these areas get a little extra love and attention.  Note also that I carefully brushed and blended around the tops of her shoulders where they will meet the armholes of her jumper.  Be careful not to mess up the highlighting you did with your airbrush back in the last step!






As a guy who loves to paint sexy girlies, the most important tool in my arsenal is . . . .  good reference material!  That's right, a good ol' Victoria's Secret catalog:



Seriously, this is an excellent source of reference if you like to paint babes.  And here's a tip for the fellas - go online and buy mama some sexy little unmentionables.  You not only get to see your beloved prance about in skimpy panties, you'll get on the Vickie's mailing list and get your OWN full color reference material every other month!  How can she object to that??

If you're too young to have a girlfriend or wife, just don't let your mom find the catalog or she'll give you the old "you'll go blind!" speech again!   :twitch:  :twitch:

Um, where was I?  Oh yeah - refer to your, ahem, reference material and use the techniques outlined above to shade the face.  Shade under her jaw, inside her ears, under the brow, along side her nose and under her lower lip.  Define the hollow areas of the cheeks and add a bit of blush while you're at it.  With Future Girl, we are going to add another band of color across her eyes later on, but for now define the facial features.




Once you're happy with everything, blow any remaining excess powder off the model (I use canned air) and seal your progress with Dullcote.

And here she is, ready for masking!  Next up: painting her clothing.




Adeon000

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2007, 04:00:33 PM »
It's looking amazing so far (but everything you do does ;))

Thanks for the indepth wips, until reading about how you use pastels to shade i was entirely clueless, so i say thank you for the in depth wips, they do us all good im sure!

Silly question early on but how do you accurately mask off the areas you've already worked on? (ie skin)

It'll probably be in a following wip but im sure details of how you mask will help increase all our skills  :D

Butt kissing over  :twitch: , look forward to seeing more wip  :ninja:

FilmMkr

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2007, 02:11:36 PM »
Man oh man, lotsa views, but very few replies (other than my own, of course).  Just curious - are you guys getting anything out of this or am I wasting your time?  It feels kinda like I'm talking to myself!  :wacko:

Oh well, on to masking and painting her jumper and boots.  :embarrased:

Adeon000 asks:

Quote
It'll probably be in a following wip but im sure details of how you mask will help increase all our skills.

I like to mask complex areas with AIZU tape.  It comes in varying thicknesses, but I've found that the 1 mm width works best for masking around compound curves.




That's not to say that you can't make your own micro-thin tape strips, though.  Just break out the Tamiya tape, a straightedge, and put a fresh #2 blade in your trusty Xacto!



I cut off a workable length and apply it to the areas I want to mask, keeping some tension on the tape so that I can work it around the curved areas.  This is particularly useful when cutting in around her, um, private parts.




Once the edges are masked, I come back in with wider strip of Tamiya tape and finish masking the areas to be covered.  Be really careful and make sure that you don't leave any micro-gaps where paint might sneak through.  (Again, this is experience talking here!)  :(  :(  :(

When masking in areas where I want a really sharp edge I always burnish each strip of tape as its laid down, then after everything is masked, I go back over what I've done and burnish the entire area with vigor and enthusiasm.  This will seal all of the various layers and help prevent that dreaded overspray from seping under the ONE loose flap in your masking job!  Remember, you are building a series of miniature models that you will eventually assemble into the finished model.  This kind of attention to detail is a pain in the ass, but if you want to continue to improve and take your modeling to the next level, take the time to do the little things.  Believe me, it WILL pay off!  :D



For masking areas with undercuts, I'm going to try a new technique that I picked up at WonderFest a couple of weeks ago.  I learned this from Tom Grossman in a seminar, and this is the first time I've tried it.  Oh well, nothing ventured, nothing gained!  That's right, I'm going to try . . . . . Parafilm!




I cut off a small hunk, then rubbed it between my fingers to dislodge the backing paper.




I then stretched the film across the width of the grain just until the stretch marks disappeared and the film relaxed.




I laid a strip over the area I want to mask and pressed it down.  Using these nifty new tools that Tom told me about called Clay Shapers . . . .




. . . . I gently nudged the Parafilm under the undercut of her top.  If the film appears a bit loose, hold it with your thumb for a few seconds to warm it up and it'll stick right down.




Once that was done, I used a fresh #2 blade and cut away the excess.  (I didn't take any pictures of that step because, well, just because.)

Now she's ready for paint, but first, here's a tip that we use in the car modeling world when painting two tone paint jobs.  Before you lay down any new color, lay down one more coat of your basecoat OVER the edges of your masked areas.  This seals the edge of the tape and prevents any of the contrasting color from seeping under your mask job, especially you lazy types who ignored my suggestion to burnish your tape thoroughly.   :razz:  :razz:  :razz:

"But Filmy, didn't you shade the areas around the clothes with pastels?  Won't laying down another coat of your fleshtones screw with all that work?"

Yeppers, it sure will!  In this case, I shot a layer of Dullcote to seal the area instead of fleshtone.  It serves the same purpose and will prevent any seepage.  In the next step I'll show you another method to help prevent any wayward paint and help you get that razor sharp demarcation line in your paint jobs.

FichtenFoo

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2007, 03:13:48 PM »
I'm definitely getting something from this as I'm sure others are. Chime in guys! Ask questions!

1: Where did you get the parafilm?
2: What are you using as a BG for your photos? Looks reflective and nice!
Rust is beautiful.

FilmMkr

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2007, 05:59:11 PM »
Oh yay, somebody's out there!  I'll answer your questions tomorrow, Michael, when I can get you some URLs.

I originally thought I'd stick to the pearl white color for her jumper and boots, but NOOOOOO, I had to go and have a dream!  'Ya know how sometimes when you're in that state between asleep and awake and stuff just sorta comes to you?  Yeppers, that happened to me this morning and I thought "Hey!  Let's paint her clothing in the same color as Ryomou's socks!"




Since I generally listen to the voices in my head, that's what I'll do!  I think it'll look pretty cool with the pearly yellow-orangy hair, and I'll paint the trim gold instead of silver.

Here are the components for Filmy's Magic Ryomou Socks mix:




When mixing Liquitex acrylics, I've made plenty of blunders, believe-you-me!  I cannot TELL you how many times I've mixed it too thick and had it sputter and clog, and how many times the paint has spidered or run because it was too thin.  And just what IS the consistency of skim milk anyway?  I never drink the stuff!   :yucky:  :yucky:

Here's the sure-fire recipe I finally stumbled upon:  I take two large pipettes full of Polly Scale Airbrush Thinner and put 'em in a film cannister.  The next step is to cut off three worms of acrylic (about 1/4" long each) with a toothpick as I (gently) squeeze the tube over the film can.  I then put two drops of Jet Dry dishwashing rinse agent (prevents spotting!).  You can use something similar, but avoid anything that says "increases shine".  The rinse agent acts as a surfactant and breaks the surface tension of the droplets in the mix, allowing the paint to flow on very smoothly and spread evenly.

Unless, of course, your airbrush needle is dirty and you blow a couple of spots on that way.  (See picture below.)  Guess I'll need to fix that before I move on to the next step!

Anyway, I'm using Liquitex Cerulean Blue acrylic, which - if done properly and with the right amount of thinner - goes on fairly transparent.  Since I will be building up the color as I go, the first thing I need to do is lay down a preshade in the creases of her clothing, under her breasts, between her legs (oooooh!) and around her muscles.  I also add a little extra around the edges of her clothing  for a nice contrast to the skintone shading.  I'm going for a fairly dramatic look with this build - hyper realism is not even in the same ballpark with this paintup.




Next I'll need to get out the Q-Tips and a little Windex and clean up those spatters.  Then I'll start misting on the basecoat.

That's  all for today, boys and girls.  Pleasant evening, all!

Filmy

braxat2000

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2007, 09:59:55 PM »
Hi,
An excellent work. So many techniques to learn from.

The skin tones look great, can't wait to see more.

Ezechiel

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2007, 10:40:13 PM »
I'm not big on figures but it is a very nice kit, as Michael said, more stylish than some of the anime creepiness we see sometimes.
If I decide to build a figure kit someday, this thread will definitely be a reference to look at! Keep it coming!
(>:3) JESUS CHRIST IT'S A LION GET IN THE CAR!

AJL

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2007, 02:00:39 AM »
Filmy - Great WIP, please keep posting with lots of pictures and words of wisdom. Like many others, I'm not usually a figure painter, but the skills, knowledge and experience you're passing on is really appreciated all the same.

Ref. Parafilm - I use it for masking aircraft canopies.  I bought a few strips of the stuff on ebay for a few dollars.  I heard about using it on the aircraft resource centre (http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/), specifically, this tutorial: http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/tnt1/101-200/tnt124_masking_Crenshaw/tnt124.htm

It's not the easiest thing to get used to, but like everything, practice makes perfect.

Goremageddon

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2007, 05:30:41 AM »
I love figures..I love them...And your tutorials (lol) are always a pleasure to see... Since I also paint figures I´m really interested in knowing how you cutted the film without scratching the paint underneath...I always mess things up when cutting masking tape (in this case it´s film) on painted surfaces... :embarrased: :embarrased:


By the way, I learned the pastel technique from you... ^_^.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2007, 05:47:11 AM by Goremageddon »
ainting and more painting...I wanna be a painter...

FichtenFoo

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2007, 05:33:16 AM »
...And your tuts are always a pleasure to see...

oh... just wow... :lol: :razz: Boy, did I initially misread that? :shifty:
Rust is beautiful.

Goremageddon

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2007, 05:48:39 AM »
 :embarrased: :embarrased: LOL I changed that... ^_^
ainting and more painting...I wanna be a painter...

FilmMkr

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2007, 06:31:53 AM »
FichtenFoo asks:

Quote
Where did you get the parafilm?

HERE is a place that sells Parafilm online.  Can't vouch for 'em, 'cause I bought mine at a local hobby shop.  You might also check art supply stores or medical supply houses.

He also wants to know:

Quote
What are you using as a BG for your photos? Looks reflective and nice!

That is photo backdrop paper.  The particular sheet is Wynstone WYN165166 M/C Silver.  I also have some Blue Pearl (WYN165154) that looks nice, depending on the color of the tabletop piece I'm shooting.  I like Wynstone papers because they don't reflect color back on the model.  I get my Wynstone at A.I. Friedman in New York.  The paper is not on the website - you have to call Customer Service at 212.337.8600 to order it.  It comes in sheets - 39.375 x 27.5 and costs $3.64 a sheet.  I generally buy five or ten at a time, 'cause the get scarred up after a while.

AJL - thanks for the link!  I really like to check out how other modelers do things.  I can always learn something new, no matter what the subject is.  I am hoping that you guys can take something away from this tutorial/WIP even if you DON'T like girls.  (Not that there's anything wrong with that!)   :twitch:  :twitch:

Goremageddon - glad you like my tuts.  (And here I thought you were one of the ones who DOES like girls!)   :razz:  When cutting Parafilm - or even masking tape, for that matter - use a brand new, SHARP blade and don't press down very hard.  Let the weight of the knife make the cut.  I have a saying - "Let the tool do the job it was intended for!"  It is an acquired technique, but only practice will help you get better.  Believe me, I screw up quite often - and so, believe it or not, does Michael (just ask him!)

Filmy




ZLuca

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Re: Future Girl
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2007, 08:09:26 AM »
One of the best WIP I've never seen Filmy!
you're a true professional man!
Even if I generally don't like figures, you make me want to make one!! :twitch:
Looking forward to see more!
Great!
z