Author Topic: Reccomendations\Opinions on routers\dremels  (Read 5925 times)

March 03, 2007, 04:44:56 AM
Read 5925 times

lekkertakkies

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Hi

I am considering getting a router/dremel for modding plastic kits (removing plastic in hard to access areas) and removing pouring stubs on resin.

So far I have seen the:
-Tamiya Electric Handy Router at HLJ and Lucky Model
-Mr Hobby Cordless Electric Router at HLJ and Lucky Model

They are both cheap (less than US$20).
My questions are
-Has anyone ever used these tools before
-How durable are they
-Would they suit my needs
-Would you recommend another product

March 03, 2007, 10:38:56 AM
Reply #1

Zers

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in my opinion, you'll be better off just going to your local hardware store and picking something up. Also, imo, battery powered is a bad idea, you get limited torque because of limited power. Do yourself a favor and buy a dremel brand dremel for a few extra bucks, and  it'll last you forever and have more torque than you'll need.

March 03, 2007, 09:04:50 PM
Reply #2

oteebzo

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I agree with Zers. dremel makes the best brand. Spend the extra dough and get a dremel brand and make sure that you can hook the extended arm to it which is much smaller and easier to us.

March 05, 2007, 12:33:00 PM
Reply #3

thor777

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You can get Dremel packages from Wal-Mart.  I just got one last week (the XPR400 3/51 w/bonus flexlite) for $80.  Comes with the flex shaft addon for more control.  They also sell individual models I think for around $30.

March 05, 2007, 02:09:45 PM
Reply #4

bhop73

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The problem with Dremels and the like, is the speed is too high for most plastic modeling.  It's easy to melt it if you're not careful.  I can't find any that spin slower than 5000 rpm.  While those battery powered ones move pretty slow in comparison.

Personally, I have a Craftsman brand rotary tool, which is sold at Sears.  It works exactly the same as the more expensivev "Dremel" brand, but it's definitely too fast most of the time, so I rarely use it.

March 05, 2007, 03:44:54 PM
Reply #5

Marc

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I know that Kow Yokoyama (the guy who created Ma.K.) uses a  Electric Handy Router regularly (cf. "Ma.K. Modeling Book"). I'd say it's a good reference.

March 05, 2007, 04:35:10 PM
Reply #6

Irk

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I have to ditto bhops comments. If your primary use for a rotary tool is going to be for sanding plastic models - then a dremel might not be your best choice.

Don't get me wrong, I have a dremel (with an additional flexible shaft) which I LOVE and use for everything . . . except models. 5000 rpm will melt most plastics/styrene used for models and won't 'sand' them. You need a much slower rpm to accomplish that.

However I have had good results using the dremel on harder surfaces such as cured miliput, magic sculpt, durhams water putty, and scuply. Also if you use it on acrylic sheets it seems to work alright and not melt the stuff.

You might find usful the info on this site from past threads on adapting an electric toothbrush to be a small part sander.
Write a wise saying and your name will live forever - Anonymous

March 05, 2007, 04:45:24 PM
Reply #7

FichtenFoo

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Man... I must be a minority then because I use my Dremel CONSTANTLY. Not for sanding, but for cleaning burrs on the inside of metal tubes I cut, or gouging out large areas of a kit for conversions, etc... I used in a bunch on the Slave 1 so far for making space for the battery and mechanisms. I have some small drill bits too (pin-vise sized) that I use occasionally too. It's an invaluable tool. Not it's not for fine detail work, but for rough cutting it's a must!

March 05, 2007, 11:13:25 PM
Reply #8

spiffitz

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Browse the Dremel section and you will find many bits you didn't think existed. Many of them are perfect for smoothing plastic at high speed without melting. The "Scotch brite" pads are a good example. For lots of cutting and fast shaping, the "normal" bits are fine if you work slowly and let the bit do the work. Jamming a sanding drum at high speed against plastic is sure to cause melting.

As far as the flex shaft, I find it clumsy and don't use it much. It's like tying your pencil to a fishing pole then trying to write.
Ron

March 05, 2007, 11:37:30 PM
Reply #9

RoboSmurf

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Mircomark also sells foot petals to control electric tools. This is a great thing to use with a Dremel set at the loest speed. It helps to keep it a little slower.

Foot Petal

March 06, 2007, 02:34:23 AM
Reply #10

Mindless

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Quote from: "FichtenFoo"
Man... I must be a minority then because I use my Dremel CONSTANTLY. Not for sanding, but for cleaning burrs on the inside of metal tubes I cut, or gouging out large areas of a kit for conversions, etc... I used in a bunch on the Slave 1 so far for making space for the battery and mechanisms. I have some small drill bits too (pin-vise sized) that I use occasionally too. It's an invaluable tool. Not it's not for fine detail work, but for rough cutting it's a must!


I'll have to second that.

It's also an invaluable  tool when working with resin kits where there may be inconsistencies in the plastic. You can remove so much more material so much faster than if you would use your typical file or some sand paper. Most recently I used mine to put a polycap in the head joint on my Nu Gundam Conversion (seen in the WIP board). Worked like a charm and just took me a few seconds, instead of long and tedious carving with some different tools.

And besides, when you don't use it for modeling, it can be a very useful for other things aswell.  :)

Quote from: "RoboSmurf"
Mircomark also sells foot petals to control electric tools. This is a great thing to use with a Dremel set at the loest speed. It helps to keep it a little slower.

Foot Petal


Been thinking of investing in one of thoes. Should be very useful when doing some more fine work.