Author Topic: Mr. Sufacer and Primer Questions (post 'em here)  (Read 97602 times)

July 11, 2006, 05:47:07 AM
Reply #60

Marc

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Plus I love how models look when primed. :D
Primer is definitely a must. I had hard time painting blue parts orange and I don't want to live that ever again! :razz:

July 11, 2006, 05:48:14 AM
Reply #61

FichtenFoo

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Red is a difficult color to paint as well unless primed first.

July 12, 2006, 05:42:33 PM
Reply #62

accord99

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I used a whole bottle of Mr. Surfacer and put it in a big Gerber baby food jar, I mixed about 6:4 thinner to surfacer. I don't really know how many drops of retarder to use, so I put in about 5 drops or so. The outcome is good, and it's a perfect mixing solution, so i don't need to mix next time I'm priming  because already got the whole jar. And of course the Gerber's jar is pretty tight so I won't fear of the surfacer drying out.

July 31, 2006, 09:51:29 AM
Reply #63

AndreZero

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How do you apply your primer?  Most primers come in spray cans but comments like what accord99 just said and this tutorial http://www.swannysmodels.com/Alclad.html seem to imply that using an airbrush is a better method.  

I understand an airbrush will give you more control of the spray, but if you want to cover everything anyway, why not use the spray can.  

I've never used primer from either a spray can or an airbrush so I don't know the pros and cons of either method.

July 31, 2006, 09:54:36 AM
Reply #64

Marc

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I use spray cans, it's handy since you don't have to clean your airbrush but yeah, it's probably less accurate.

July 31, 2006, 09:56:48 AM
Reply #65

FichtenFoo

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I've found that airbrushing the primer gives you a smoother surface with less risk of drips and such.

July 31, 2006, 12:30:21 PM
Reply #66

ele_swkc

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I started out with cans, but now I airbrush it. I use Mr. Surfacer 1000 thinned with Mr. Thinner. My thinner to primer ratio is usually 60 to 40, sometimes 65 to 35.

It goes on smooth, and if you've got a double action airbrush it's easy to regulate the amount of thinner so you don't obscure details.

Spray cans waste a lot of primer because of overspray, and the window of not enough primer on a piece to too much primer is literally one or two sprays.

July 31, 2006, 12:56:35 PM
Reply #67

AndreZero

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Thanks for the replies.  Now I've got a followup question.  

If I'm using a single action air brush, do I gain enough for it to be worthwhile using the airbrush over the cans?

Right now I'm leaning towards using the spray can for my current project (knowing that FichtenFoo and ele_swkc now have the right to say "told ya so!").

July 31, 2006, 01:05:14 PM
Reply #68

FichtenFoo

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Well, a single action still wuld be preferrable to a can. You can adjust the spray of the single action to be smaller or parger depending on the needle placement. (further back=larger spray pattern) You can set it smaller and  save primer for certain.

August 10, 2006, 06:32:33 PM
Reply #69

adiver

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Btw, can 0.3mm airbrush be used to airbrush mr surfacer 1000? Thanks

August 11, 2006, 05:17:07 PM
Reply #70

ele_swkc

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Quote from: "adiver"
Btw, can 0.3mm airbrush be used to airbrush mr surfacer 1000? Thanks


I believe my Iwata HP-C is .3mm, and I use 1000 through it with no problems.

August 12, 2006, 09:52:14 PM
Reply #71

adiver

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Ic, Thanks.
I found intesting site regarding using mr surface, especially mixing other color to mr white base.
Too bad i dont understand japanese. :-(

http://www.e-yamashiroya.com/enjoyhobby/wing_g/jh_008/index.html

August 13, 2006, 05:18:07 AM
Reply #72

Traks

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Quote from: "adiver"
Ic, Thanks.
I found intesting site regarding using mr surface, especially mixing other color to mr white base.
Too bad i dont understand japanese. :-(

http://www.e-yamashiroya.com/enjoyhobby/wing_g/jh_008/index.html


Babel Fish Translation came up with this

Quote from: "Babel Fish"
Well, preface became long, but (usual thing?) It enters into job. First as first spoken, the paint was mixed into based white, the foundation medicine of the original color, ' カラーサフ ' it makes. In order red and the yellow color which paint, to show color more vividly, the orange foundation is made. This orange foundation is an effect which coloration of both color is improved. Method of making very simplicity. In based white proper quantity, the paint of the orange the small quantity is mixed. In order this time, not to become excessively dense color, while looking at circumstances, it keeps mixing the paint little by little. When pouring to the cup of the airbrush, when the toning stick is guided, it can pour without spilling. When it becomes the color which is the taste, in the reducer diluting in 3 and 4 times, you pour to the cup of the airbrush. When diluting in the cup of the airbrush, the paint a little (generally about 1/4) is poured in the cup, the reducer is inserted. When density of the paint is too dense, the nozzle cannot be plugged, paint cleanly. First because proper density is difficult to know, before pouring to the cup, you recommend that density is adjusted in the paper glass. When the reducer is inserted, flowing backward the air, it agitates through the cup of the airbrush. The paint, because it is heavier than the reducer, you stir in the cup this way. This job is called "gargling". As for the photograph the place where it points to gargling. That you think whether in the cup flabbily the bubble you can understand that it stands. Color tend of the paint is, but it is can Venn, -> Type of tip crack nozzle loosens the nozzle part, flows backward the air. The type where the tip has not cracked, holding down the nozzle part with the finger, flows backward the air. When you can prepare the paint, be sure to try and to blow. The プラ board you try truth and it meaning that the fact that you blow is ideal, you do, but blowing it is in the nail and the ちゃっ て increases. To tell the truth the nail does, the surface having done the crane crane, being to be quick, but the bean jam ball we cannot recommend, (the sweat) as for コレ to tell the truth bad example -> Doing the trial blowing, you verify the density of the paint and the feeling of color. When density of the paint is dense, it becomes the feeling which is done roughly. In that case, adding the reducer a little, density you adjust. When it is thin, the paint is added a little.


Hope that helps.

October 07, 2006, 01:38:56 AM
Reply #73

Vinny

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Just a quick question.  Does any company make flat white primer?  I'd like to use white primer so the colors I paint the model will show up how I want them, and not darker like with gray.  Oly white primers I can find are semi gloss or gloss.

October 07, 2006, 03:29:57 AM
Reply #74

Red Comet

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Tamiya does a white primer. The grey type is normal, white type is fine type which gives a lot smoother finish. The problem I have with the white type is that sometimes small errors and mistakes aren't seen until the colour layer goes on - at least with the grey type mistakes and poor sanding/seems show up easier.

Have you tried giving the grey primed layer a coat of flat white? I know it sounds silly and a waste of paint but it is another option.

October 07, 2006, 04:25:30 AM
Reply #75

Scarylion

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Vallejo do a white aerosol primer
size=9]In one episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Chuck Norris replaced Carlton for one scene and nobody noticed.[/size]

October 09, 2006, 01:31:40 PM
Reply #76

arbalest

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First of all I apologize if this was repeated i did some search on the forum and cant seemed to find a definitive answer

so here it is

Can i use MR.Surfacer with Tamiya Spray Paint and Tamiya XF and X series paint and can i mix Mr.Color Thinner with Tamiya's Paints?

thank you for your tips in advance.

October 09, 2006, 10:23:49 PM
Reply #77

Vinny

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Hey guys.  So, I started priming all the pieces of the model now, and I've noticed now that the colors are coming out very dull.  The whites, the red, the yellows, and just so dull now, as opposed to when I was just putting them on the plastic.  So, will a clear coat make the colors more vibrant?  Or if I'm going to be priming from now on, should I grab some brighter colors?

October 09, 2006, 10:52:38 PM
Reply #78

zerobxu

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Quote from: "Vinny"
Hey guys.  So, I started priming all the pieces of the model now, and I've noticed now that the colors are coming out very dull.  The whites, the red, the yellows, and just so dull now, as opposed to when I was just putting them on the plastic.  So, will a clear coat make the colors more vibrant?  Or if I'm going to be priming from now on, should I grab some brighter colors?

A. What type of primer did you end up using? White Tamiya? Gray automobile primer? What?
B. Are you using flat colors to begin with?

Based on the information you've provided, I'm guessing that you've got the paint on thin. Try another coat or two. And yes, a gloss clear coat will give a bit of a shine/gloss to flat/dull colors. It won't make them shiny, but you will see the difference.
"The parrot is the bird that talks the most and flies the worst."
-The Wright Brothers

October 09, 2006, 11:01:03 PM
Reply #79

Vinny

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I ended up grabbing a couple of bottles of Testor's flat grey primer.  The color it comes out depends on the color of the plastic I pray it on.  In the bottle, it looks more like a dirty white then a grey.  It's the only kind of primer I could find in store that was flat and not in spray cans.
And I'm using Tamiya flat white, blue, and red for my "Gundam" colors.  They seemed to match the direction book pretty well.  If anyone can recommmend what they use for typical Gundam colors, I'm all ears.  I wanted to do the model in all flat colors, ad then use the Future floor coat to make it shiny in the end.