Author Topic: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials  (Read 16892 times)

zerobxu

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #40 on: August 20, 2007, 04:54:04 AM »
I wanted to know how would one go about building say a Claymore as a weapon on a Master Grade kit? I believe Fichten has a Red Astray with a metal and plastic build I would like to know how to go about this.
Can I assume that you're referring to what's known as the "Highland claymore", which is essentially a two-handed meat-cleaver of destruction?

If you're "upgrading" that to a MG-appropriate weapon, you're probably going to use a combination of rods or tubes (square or round) for the handle, and layered up strips or sheets of styrene for the blade. I would suggest you refer to the Kompleted Entries for the "Krazy Kustom Kampfer Kompetition. There are are a couple outstanding melee weapon build-ups in there. "Final Fantasy VII" (and the many swords o' Cloud) might be a good reference, as well.
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Roy_Brewer

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #41 on: August 20, 2007, 12:45:03 PM »
Thank you for the quick reply. I'm preplanning right now for an all melee medieval Zaku that is designed around speed and reaction times.

DrDazzle

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #42 on: September 12, 2007, 10:52:39 PM »
Thank you for the quick reply. I'm preplanning right now for an all melee medieval Zaku that is designed around speed and reaction times.


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I am sort of off and on working on a large Claymore esque sword for the old Rick Dom II kit. I find a relatively easy way to build one is to take a relatively thin piece of styrene, cut to the outline of the whole blade. Then, cut two pieces of styrene that are a bit thicker (depends on how thick you want the sword itself), and cut them around the same way you did the first piece, but stopping at one side depending on where you want the bevel to start. Then, after gluing the thicker pieces to either side, get something like Polyester Putty and slather it along the blade portion of the sword, shaving off the excess. Once dry, sand, and re-apply putty as needed.

I hope that makes sense. If not, I can try to make an instructional diagram in some sort of photo editing shop... of elements.

AnatoleFarmond

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #43 on: March 11, 2008, 09:59:52 PM »
So, reading through this for some information, I find myself with a few questions.

1) What method of cutting do some of you guys use when gutting thin strips, or very small detail, like small rectangle shapes, etc.

2) I have a X-Acto compass cutter for cutting circles, but the thing was a waste of money since it cant do much and it slips everywhere, how do you recommend cutting circles? (I have a bunch of circle templates, are they a possibility?)

3) Working with a round surface, it's not easy! I've been working on a the Ping-Pong ball build off, and those little things are hard to not only measure, but to cut accurately, any advice on this?
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Ezechiel

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #44 on: March 12, 2008, 02:02:47 AM »
1) Same way I cut the rest of the sheets. I'm just more careful.
2) Hard one. In my limited experience, I use a template or something to draw the shape, then I cut the basic outline, trim the edges and sand it to the final shape.
Not the best solution but it kinda works.
3) Used those only once for the shoulder pads on my mak walker. Basically I cut the ball, made a prototype of the pad then used  it as a template to get two identical parts. Same thing than for circles, cut the outline roughly, then sand.
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fulcy

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #45 on: March 12, 2008, 03:24:32 AM »
Cutting circles - how big are we talking?  for the small stuff, I use punches:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=3838

Those are great, cause you not only get a round hole, you also get a round disk.  For much smaller holes - or the corners of rectangular cut outs - I use the end of a piece of small diameter stainless steel tubing, that I've filed the inside of to basically make it a punch.  Use first in the corners of what you want to cut out (after marking the shape with a pencil), then cut between the holes with an exacto, and viola, perfect round corners.

AnatoleFarmond

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #46 on: March 12, 2008, 04:15:25 AM »
Ezechiel:
Sometimes the easiest solution is the hardest to think of, but I thought my questions would benefit other modelers facing similar questions. The one about the circles especially, I would have never thought to drawn a circle, cut a square, then cut the edges. Thanks a lot, very helpful.

Fulcy:
Awesome stuff here, those look very useful, and the rounded edges technique is very interesting, even without those tools this is helpful to get an idea of how to even make something that serves a similar purpose. Thanks!
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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #47 on: March 12, 2008, 11:26:11 AM »
1. I will buy a large sheet of styrene, then make a few long strips and cut it down to size. the smaller the strip the more careful I have to be. If you have to make a lot of strips that have to be of a uniformed size, then you are better off buying some precut thin strips. Another thing that helps, is save all of your scrap pieces of styrene, after a major scratchbuild, these will be helpful in the future.

2. A circle compass with a cutter is useful, I have a compass with a adapter for the cutting blade, I will use a pin vise to drill a very small guide hole for the needle. this helps the center point of the compass stay in place. The thicker the styrene piece is, the more sanding is required to get a clean edge.

3. I am not very good at cutting ball shapes either, I am interest learning any useful techniques from anyone else.
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AnatoleFarmond

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #48 on: March 12, 2008, 02:48:31 PM »
Awesome, the tutorial about cutting the strips was very informative. I think my problem is is that I spend so much time thinking about the complex solutions, that I often forget the simple ones, just something I will learn over time.

Your guide to cutting circles with the pin vice is a great idea, seriously, these are the simple things I'm talking about. I've found having all the tools in the world doesn't mean anything if you don't know how to use them.
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