Author Topic: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials  (Read 16914 times)

Ezechiel

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2007, 02:18:27 PM »
I use several size but it's bigger than what you use I'd say from what you wrote. My main sanding tool is generally a 6x3x4cm block; I'll take a picture of it. I like to have something I move my part on rather than moving the sanding tool.
I can't quite picture those triangles you're talking about, could you provide a picture?
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oteebzo

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2007, 02:33:06 PM »
Fulcy, are you talking about something like what I did here on the back of the skirts?
http://img181.imageshack.us/img181/56/e1vx3.jpg

Basicly its the same as this photo you provided. Like the frame work on the back of that skirt. How do you get into that shape to sand?

Or do you just scrap the excess glue out?
« Last Edit: March 08, 2007, 02:36:28 PM by oteebzo »

Ezechiel

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2007, 02:55:11 PM »
Well first of all I guess there wasn't much to clean in the first place: the inside shape was sanded before gluing and I guess I didn't have much excess of glue.
But to answer you question, to sand that, I use a new corner of a sand-paper sheet. The rigidity and the 90° angle of the paper makes it easy to get into small places and sand them.
I feel like I'm sooo not helping :D
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clee-cm

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2007, 03:44:38 PM »
After reading the replies, I am not sure what else to add... May be you should try using a more rigid sanding block, like Ezechiel mentioned a thick block of wood is a good sanding block. A popsicle stick, flexible files and soft sanding blocks are a little to flexible for heavy duty sanding. You could invest some money in a set of jeweler's files, they are small enough to do some detail sanding work.

« Last Edit: March 08, 2007, 03:47:48 PM by clee-cm »
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xamel1975

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2007, 04:56:53 PM »
My brother is currently scratchbuilding a Ferret scout car using a Tamiya's 1/35th Daimler Scout Car as a base for our National Day Group Build. He did a step by step in-progress at our local Scale Modeller forum.

He mainly uses 1mm plastic plates for the build up. It's far from completion but it may provide some scratchbuilding guideline.
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Irk

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2007, 07:15:35 PM »
If you are scratch building with styrene then the trick is as much with the glue as with the technique. Try this stuff out:



It's actually not considered a 'glue' but a 'weld'. It is soooo easy to use. Just hold together the two pieces of styrene tight, use a micro brush (the green handled thing) and touch it to the seam. Capilary action sucks the weld into the joint. Hold it for 10 seconds and you have a strong bond. The best part is that the weld evaporates and doesn't leave glue bulges. It works by slightly melting the plastic then dissapears for a clean sharp edge. You have to play with it to get the hang of it. The weld is like a water consistency so you need an aplicator brush of some kind (like the one pictured). It's almost like applying a pin wash - the weld will find the creases and joints - then dissapear once it has worked it's magic.



I use it almost exclusively when scratchbuilding. You can use it for laminating pieces too. And since it does not leave a glue residue - you are left with just sanded styrene when you're done:



P.S. It is easy to knock over the glue bottle . . . and since it is so watery, you can loose a lot of the weld. That is why I have glued the bottle to the wooden coaster in the picture above. :D
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clee-cm

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2007, 07:26:40 PM »
I have to second the recommendation of Ambroid Proweld, I will leave it at that...

I discussed this in more detail in the proper sticky...
« Last Edit: March 08, 2007, 07:27:44 PM by clee-cm »
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Irk

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2007, 04:44:45 PM »
Here is a pic as way of reference for aplication of the afore mentioned weld adhesive:



These pieces were random styrene pieces from my scrap bin assembled in about 30 seconds. You can see that it bonds even small edges and is strong enough to support weight at the end of long narrow piece.

This is awesome in the scratch building arena because you can assemble difficult small projects with ease. It allows you to accomplish a lot in one sitting - without having to wait a long time for glue to dry.
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Haseo

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #28 on: May 09, 2007, 05:25:09 AM »
I'm just wondering, when you bend styrene sheets does it have to be the thin kind? because I'm trying to do it with the thick kind.
hmm.. no one ever replys to my posts do i kill threads or something?!?!??!<br />mod edit: yes... yes you do<br />

fulcy

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #29 on: May 09, 2007, 05:51:38 AM »
You can warm thicker sheets in hot water, then bend them...

Haseo

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #30 on: May 09, 2007, 01:26:34 PM »
ahh I see thanks man
!




umm when i wrapped it around a thick pen to get a full circle it snaps and i cant bend it back   



do you guys have any idea how to make a full circle with the thick styrene sheets ?
« Last Edit: May 09, 2007, 05:18:54 PM by Haseo »
hmm.. no one ever replys to my posts do i kill threads or something?!?!??!<br />mod edit: yes... yes you do<br />

xamel1975

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #31 on: May 09, 2007, 08:34:33 PM »
To get a full circle, I would suggest you get a plastic pipes instead of bending the styrene sheet. It's less hassle.
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fulcy

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #32 on: May 10, 2007, 01:48:56 AM »
Yes, plastic pipe would be better than trying to make your own (though, if the plastic snaps, you aren't heating it enough).  You could also look into PVC pipe - very thick walls, and plastic cement works with it...

Goremageddon

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #33 on: June 04, 2007, 07:54:22 AM »
I have a really noob question...What tool do I need in order to cut plastic sheets??Either thick or thin? There was someone who posted this, but the link fulcy gave isn´t functioning....SOrry...

The link was this

http://fichtenfoo.com/v-web/bulletin/bb/viewtopic.php?t=1762

I really wanted to know what do I need to buy to cut it right..I´ve been using a saw and it messes with that stuff a lot...
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FichtenFoo

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #34 on: June 04, 2007, 08:27:29 AM »
Just modify the old forum link with the new ones to get the following:

http://fichtenfoo.com/forum/index.php?topic=1762.0
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DrDazzle

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #35 on: August 14, 2007, 02:31:58 PM »
Can you guys tell me what are some good all purpose styrene sheets thicknesses? The last bit of styrene I owned was the Tamiya Pla Plate Assortment, which was a long time ago, so I never needed to pick sizes.

Thanks for teh info.

zerobxu

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #36 on: August 14, 2007, 06:52:00 PM »
I prefer working in 020 (0.5 mm) and 030 (0.8 mm) personally, but I also work with much thinner pieces, if you're talking about strips.
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clee-cm

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #37 on: August 14, 2007, 07:13:51 PM »
I use .020 .040 thick styrene for scratch building, and general model building; I also use .080 thick styrene for strengthening and to provide extra support, the thin sheets of styrene like .010 and .015 are good for making access panes and closed hatches on small scale models. The extremely thick (.080) and thin (.010) size sheets of styrene are not used all that often, so a small sheet often goes a long way.

There are several different companies that make sheets of styrene, evergreen scale models is the most common brand, it is available at most hobby shops. I buy my styrene at www.walthers.com, they are a model railroad company, and sell a variety of different sized styrene sheets including 12"x24" sheets.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2007, 08:40:10 AM by clee-cm »
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Ezechiel

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #38 on: August 15, 2007, 02:04:40 AM »
Since I live in the wonderful land of MILLIMETERS, I usually use 0.5, 1, and 2mm. Each thickness has its use so it's always good to have different ones!
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Roy_Brewer

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Re: Scratch Building Questions and Tutorials
« Reply #39 on: August 19, 2007, 03:07:25 PM »
I wanted to know how would one go about building say a Claymore as a weapon on a Master Grade kit? I believe Fichten has a Red Astray with a metal and plastic build I would like to know how to go about this.