Author Topic: Panel Line Question  (Read 6918 times)

November 27, 2006, 01:54:22 PM
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Oliphont

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Hey guys,

As i built my first real model (Neue Ziel) i painted, putty-ed, blah blah blah, and finally came to the dilemma as to how to deal with the panel lines and what not. I decided to use a .35mm pen, but for upcoming (and future) projects (Hasegawa Veritechs, and other Gundam models) that have a considerable amount of more panel lines i need to develop a good wash method. I have been doing a good bit of research (tutorials on this site, as well as others) and i was just wondering if 'in theory' this would work well:

1. Do all the assembly up until painting. (cutting alot of steps out :D)
2. Hand paint the model using brushes and 'Model Master' Enamel paints.
3. Allow to dry etc.
4. Using a bit of water, a drop of detergent (to get rid of water's surface tension property), and a tiny bit of acrylic paint (whatever color i decide i want to use for lines).
5. Brush on lines, allow to dry
6. Wipe away excess using a bit of windex and either paper towel or q-tip etc.

Will this work? My concerns are that the wash will either, possibly soak itself into a flat paint job, or not stick in right. Not really sure, i just wanted some feedback before i went and acquired all the supplies to make the wash.

Thanks,
Ollie

PS. I hope this post adheres to all the guidelines, didn't really see a sticky on washes.

November 27, 2006, 02:04:57 PM
Reply #1

Major Blah

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I think you just need to gloss coat your hand-painted kit before applying the wash, and all should be good.  I don't know what's the best way to apply gloss without air-brush.  Maybe it's spray can, or maybe you can hand paint coats of future.  I'll leave it to the knowledgeable hand-painters to answer this question.

November 27, 2006, 02:17:32 PM
Reply #2

FichtenFoo

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Future goes on rather nicely with a cotton-swab. Just be sure to soak off any excess with bits of towel. I used cotton-swabbed FFA on my Tachikoma.

November 27, 2006, 02:24:52 PM
Reply #3

Oliphont

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Yeah after reading a few articles from here and other sites it sounds like Future is almost critical to the whole process.

Do you honestly think i can get away with the wash without a good clear coat?

November 27, 2006, 02:46:59 PM
Reply #4

Major Blah

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Quote from: "Oliphont"

Do you honestly think i can get away with the wash without a good clear coat?


No.  Without a good clear coat it'll smear and make a big mess.

November 27, 2006, 03:55:12 PM
Reply #5

zerobxu

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Agreed: No clear coat = mess

An alternative to FFA is a spray can glossy overcoat. Something from Testors or Model Masters should work. FFA is arguably considered the best, though.
"The parrot is the bird that talks the most and flies the worst."
-The Wright Brothers

November 27, 2006, 04:05:02 PM
Reply #6

Oliphont

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Well sounds like FFA is the only choice :D

I'll search for a bottle near here, if not, ill order one or go for simply a clear coat spray.

November 27, 2006, 04:41:05 PM
Reply #7

gamerabaenre

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Mr Super Clear Gloss is another wonderful product.  However, it is lacquer based.

November 27, 2006, 05:18:19 PM
Reply #8

Oliphont

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Just to clear up, is there any issue with me using Enamel Paint, FF Clear coat, and then an acrylic based wash?

If i don't use FF, what should the clear coat be based on?

November 27, 2006, 05:30:49 PM
Reply #9

gamerabaenre

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If you are using FFA, do not use an acrylic based wash.  Best to use an enamel based wash.

The idea is that the clear coat is a different paint type than the wash solution.

If you used a lacquer clear coat, you can use acrylic or enamel.
If you use FFA, you should only use enamel
If you use an enamel based clear, use an acrylic based wash.

November 30, 2006, 03:44:49 PM
Reply #10

Oliphont

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I think what i am going to do is use Enamel paints for the model, then use Mr. Super Clear Gloss (lacquer based) then do the wash based on acrylics. Then do decals. Then do a final coat.

That good?

November 30, 2006, 04:10:11 PM
Reply #11

gamerabaenre

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Yes.  The important thing is to clear coat it before you attempt the wash.  And that the wash is a different paint type than the clear coat.  Acrylics over lacquer are perfect.  It's ones on preference as to when to lay down decals, before panel lines, after panels...  What you have structured is fine.  A final clear coat in either gloss, flat, or semi gloss will be the last thing to spray onto your model and you can then stamp the sucker done.

Just do it.  Once you get going and after a couple of models, you'll find your own structure and style.  It all boils down to experience.  You can read all the tips and such... but until you actually sit down and cut your teeth a little - it's all theoretical.  Get something done and post up the results.  Then we can go from there with critiques and how to "improve" if there exists room for improvement :)

November 30, 2006, 04:55:27 PM
Reply #12

mtomczek

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Quote from: "gamerabaenre"
Mr Super Clear Gloss is another wonderful product.  However, it is lacquer based.


I just used Mr Super Clear Gloss on my Kampfer project and it works great. Highly recommended, and not terribly expensive if you order from Rainbow 10

November 30, 2006, 06:01:18 PM
Reply #13

Oliphont

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Yeah, well i got an MG Crossbone X-1 Ver Ka. on the way from Gundamstoreandmore.com and a good buddy of mine ordered an MG F91, so this will be our first real 'Gundam' models with the whole 'pro' process. So im not setting my hopes too high, as i'm expecting to learn more than anything else.

Thanks for all the help guys!!

December 05, 2006, 02:15:04 PM
Reply #14

Oliphont

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I just realized my father has some clear coat in a can back home, and im almost positive it is Lacquer based, has anyone ever used stuff like that for models (like cans from Home Depot)??

December 05, 2006, 11:00:57 PM
Reply #15

D:Fuse

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Quote from: "Oliphont"
I just realized my father has some clear coat in a can back home, and im almost positive it is Lacquer based, has anyone ever used stuff like that for models (like cans from Home Depot)??



You should test it on unused plastic and see what the result is first.