Author Topic: MG F-91 (Up close shot)  (Read 1752 times)

October 11, 2006, 02:56:06 PM
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Vinny

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OK, so I wanted to take pictures of my poorly done model, when I realized that perhaps 7.1 megapixels is too much.  He's a piece of armor from the F-91 that I primed, painted, Futured, paneled, then Futured again.  From me just looking at it, it looks smooth an fine.  But, point blank under the lense, looks wierd.

Just thought it'd be neat to show.  I also noticed I missed some flash on the part...

October 11, 2006, 03:00:13 PM
Reply #1

riccardo

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Well at least you can say you have a wonderful macro!!!
which camera do you use?

P.S> I'm working on the same model

October 11, 2006, 07:55:16 PM
Reply #2

Vinny

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Quote from: "riccardo"
Well at least you can say you have a wonderful macro!!!
which camera do you use?

P.S> I'm working on the same model


Hey Ricardo!  Saw you post, too.  Pretty nice kit, huh?  
I use a Canon Powershot A620.  VERY nice camera.  It's only downside is it takes AA batteries, but if you buy some rechargeable ones, your set.  THe best part is, it only cost me $200 at office depot.  Highly recommended if you're trying to find a decent digital camera.
How far on the kit are you?  I've got the body and the head done, and I'm workig on the arms.

October 11, 2006, 09:04:40 PM
Reply #3

Shin0bu

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those lines...are they scratches or brush stroke lines?
some topcoat shud be able to hide it... i think  :?

October 11, 2006, 09:19:17 PM
Reply #4

Vinny

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Shinobu, I don't know.  I've been airbrushing this whole kit, so I can only guess the scratches are from sanding, which I don't see how, since I'm sanding with like 600 grit.  I figured priming followed by painting wouldn't make that show up.
Also, when just looking at it with  he human eye, I can't see any scratches.  Heck, I can't even feel any scratches.  So, beat me what those are.

October 11, 2006, 10:52:03 PM
Reply #5

clee-cm

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Question: What kind of primer did you use?

I am asking because if you use fine white primer then the scratches will show up more.

Grey primer does a better job of hiding scratches.

Often you do not see the scratches until after the part has been cleaned primed and painted.
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October 12, 2006, 01:38:22 AM
Reply #6

Vinny

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I'm using Testor's flat grey acryll primer in the little bottles.  SPrays on a very light grey.
Also, I've found that thinning Future with Tamiya thinner works best.

October 12, 2006, 05:27:20 AM
Reply #7

zerobxu

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Vinny--did you maybe forget to wipe/clean that "scratched" area after you sanded it? Is it possible that the plastic dust is trapped underneath the paint? Of course, considering how far above actual size this is--and the fact that you're using a 7.1 megapixel camera--these marks may very well be invisible to the naked eye.
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October 12, 2006, 06:13:44 AM
Reply #8

riccardo

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Zero is right, Usually preparing surfaces wiping and also sanding with a 2000 grit (the tamiya 2000 sandpaper works perfectly) maybe underwater helps. Usually I do that. I tried to use compounds but I'm not very good with those.

October 12, 2006, 06:17:24 AM
Reply #9

fulcy

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Yeah, either using a finer sandpaper, or even some scotch brite pads (steel wool will also work), as the final pass.  Most primers should cover those scratches, but it's best to use as fine an abrasive as possible.