Author Topic: Lessons learned  (Read 2341 times)

April 15, 2005, 07:54:24 PM
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qc

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this may ramble..and seem to digress..but all does come around.

starting the work on my gouf and had some questions (to myself) about how i was going to finish the MS.  One was about using a texture on the "beaten" parts (feet, knees, etc) and two, to try my first attempt with Alclad.

I had read that most good metallic paints need a perfect surface under them as well need a gloss coat of black enamel.

For the texture I was going to try the cast texture produced by smearing on Mr. Surfacer 500 and texturizing it.  Before I could get under way, I read (somewhere) about Liquidtex producing texture mediums.  I went to my local Michaels...looked around I bought a jar of the Stucco flavor (about $8.50..but enough to last a lifetime).

For the metallics I thought I would do a cross reference swatch that showed different metallics on differnt subbases.  I had done swatch tests with a variety of primers (due to earlier frustration with paint chipping and realizing I needed a good bite into the plastic to prevent this, due to my use of acrylics).  Here is the swatch : http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y144/qclex/171-7129_IMG.jpg

There are some abbreviations...Tam=tamiya, MM = model masters, Alum=aluminum, enam=enamel.

Without a doubt, of all the squares, the one that jumps out at me is the Alclad polished aluminum on Tamiay Surface Primer.  It seems even better than that Alclad on bare plastic.  Other observations:  the tamiya metallics look like flake metallics used for car paint jobs in comparison to the Alclad, the darker metallics are not so dependent on the light/dark of the subbase.

lastly,  The MM aluminum shown looks better than actually is.  The bottle I was using was fairly old and I shoulda tossed it.  But I tried to salvage it with some extra thinner.  In my experience, they don't produce such big metallic flakes as Tamiya.

Rewind for a bit.

While in the midst of a few days of making the metallic swatch, I was priming my pieces.  I had bought a few cans of the Tamiya Spray ....being impressed with it before.  I live in a small apartment, but have a professional 3M respirator.  I had to keep the windows closed (and a cool temperature) due to the ill effects humidity can render on laquer finishes.  I sprayed and sprayed and sprayed...about 2 1/2 cans, ...prob 60% of the totaly kit needed to spray....to my dismay.  I noticed some powder building up on my modeling table.  I was the blowback from the primer.   I soon realized it was ALL OVER THE APARTMENT.  Like a layer of dust that had accumulated over a year.  fine white powder.  I was ....sad, to say the least.  I swore to myself I'de never use the product again (unless I had a spray booth).  This however was before I saw the results of the Alclad on the Tamiya spray.  soooooo, i've come to the conclusion:  Only use the Tamiya spray if going to use alclad over it, otherwise a gray enamel primer.  Second, I need to find a different place to spray when I do use the Tam primer.

Textures.

I tried the Mr. Surfacer ...500 and 1000
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y144/qclex/171-7145_IMG.jpg
the pic doesnt' do it justice.  Its nice.  But opted not to use it.  It is a somewhat thick application and the pieces I were considering had some finer detail I wasn't ready to cover up.

I also tried the Liquidtex Stucco texture medium
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y144/qclex/171-7147_IMG.jpg
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y144/qclex/171-7146_IMG.jpg
I was impressed with this stuff.
the picture shows the right half applied (smeared like the Mr. Surfacer application) while the left half shows it cut with some tap water.  The top half is then showed being lightly sanded with 300 grit s'paper.  The application was thick (hence I declined this use again).  I tried to super thin it down and spray it through my airbrush.  I thick I thinned it down too much (fearing the clog in my airbrush).  It stuck to the item airbrushed but was easily rubbed off afterwards.  I feel the the answer is to thin it down and apply by smearing.  I feel the top left of the swatch is the best.  Think it would be perfect for ...maybe 1/35 - 1/75 concrete....really really close.

I hope I've helped.

April 16, 2005, 01:40:56 PM
Reply #1

fugu

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That is very interesting

For the stucco/concrete. Would you say the results are better than say tapping a fine bristled toothbrush/stiff brush with thinned putty onto a surface? How much of a "distressed" look can you get without loosing scale or quality? Does painting over or sections reduce the effect? Would a surfacing and top coat agent help keep it all togeather?
..hmm, I'm supposed to type something witty here...

April 16, 2005, 04:14:10 PM
Reply #2

qc

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fugu..
lotsa questions...hopefully i can answer each.

- "better" than tapping putty on?  well, depends on what you're going for.  i think the tapping will produce cast iron look (if done fairly wet) and more of a ...stalagmite/sticky gum look (if the tapping keeps going as it sets up).  the stucco produced a more....porous look.  very much like real stucco or somewhat like grout, but at a finer scale.

-not exactly sure what you mean by distressed. (i know the definition of distressed, but not sure how you're using it).  its CREATING a texture...not changing another.  I suppose you could "dig" a small ditch in the plastic and thinly apply that into it, causing a "scarred" look....or perhaps apply it somewhat like zimmerit?

-if you paint correct, the effect should be enhanced with painting and further finishing (washes, drybrushing, etc).  only if the paint is incorreclty applied too thickly (perhaps by handbrushing) do i feel the effect will be lost.

- keep WHAT all together?  perhaps you're referring to when i tried to spray on the super-thinned stucco? if so, you may have a good idea.  however.  when i did super thin it....it didn't produce nearly as a dense effect.  when dried it provided a ...slightly salty kitchen counter top feel.  i sincerely doubt the stucco medium can be sprayed.  

on a side note.  i think i'm going to attempt the mr. surfacer trial again...this time however i'm going to airbrush a thin coat on then stipple it.  hopefully, the coat will be more even, thinner, and less of the surface details will be lost.  wish me luck.

April 18, 2005, 12:54:31 AM
Reply #3

fugu

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Thanks dude. That answered all my questions. :)
..hmm, I'm supposed to type something witty here...

April 19, 2005, 07:55:20 PM
Reply #4

FichtenFoo

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I still need to take shots of my Mr. Surfacer texture. I like it a lot, but it may not be what you're looking for.

I love that "grid" you did. Great stuff and it really shows off what the paint looks like under different circumstances.