Author Topic: Greebles are awesome!  (Read 5146 times)

aznbuddy

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Greebles are awesome!
« on: April 06, 2005, 07:42:02 PM »
hi ff,

i've been reading a lot of the in-progress reports and i noticed you using "greebles" called minus-molds and d-rings. i did a search and didn't come up with any explanation of how you made these.

have you ever gone into how you make or acquire these? they add such a great look to plain old panels.

thanks!
y hovercraft is full of eels!

fulcy

  • Genius is never understood in its own time
  • FFF Staff
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2135
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
    • http://www.mechaskunk.com
Greebles are awesome!
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2005, 03:42:38 AM »
I think I can handle this one - minus molds, and I believe d-rings, are option parts that Wave and other manufacturers make specifically for detailing models.  Alright, did a search on HLJ - searched for minus mold, and kotobukiya is the manufacturer.  I also tried searching for d-ring, but came up with nothing.  So FF may need to tackle that one...

FichtenFoo

  • Model On!
  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10399
  • Karma: 17
  • 16 bits of fun
    • View Profile
    • http://www.fichtenfoo.com
Greebles are awesome!
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2005, 04:15:05 AM »
The d-rings are just made from bent wire inserted into small holes drilled out with a pin-vise.

Wave also makes option parts for greebles.  :)
Rust is beautiful.

aznbuddy

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Greebles are awesome!
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2005, 09:17:22 AM »
Thanks as always!

The minus molds  need are of course, backordered from HLJ. Between HLJ's backorders and Hobby Fan's Out of Stock, it's a wonder kits get finished...

Thanks for the D-Ring explanation as well. :D
y hovercraft is full of eels!

Bawoo

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 96
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
    • Animation Scale Models 4U
Greebles are awesome!
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2005, 07:55:55 AM »
There are a bunch of ways to make your own minus molds...I've been meaning to talk about this on my website.  2 that I've used:

1. Grab some sheet styrene the thickness of the minus mold you want (.03"-.05" is probably good).  You also need a piece of brass/copper tubing the diameter of the part you want (make sure it's long enough to get a good grip), and a thin piece of metal the shape of the minus part (mini screwdrivers are good).  
  - Sharpen the end of the tube by rotating it while pressing it against a large flat file.
  - Use the tube to cut a circle out of the sheet plastic, pressing it firmly into the plastic and rotating until it cuts through (you may have to practice a bit to get good circles, and resharpen the tube occasionally).  If they stick in the end of the tube, poke them out with a long stiff wire.
  - Heat up the end of the screwdriver or whatever you found with a lighter or stove, then press it gently into the little circle to make the minus.  Wait a few seconds until it cools to pull it out. I like to hold the circles down with a loop of tape to keep them under control.

2. This one makes better looking minus molds, and is better for larger parts.  You again need a tube the diameter of the minus mold you want (you could use plastic, but metal is stronger and thus easier to get even shapes from ).  You also need some kind of filler (I use a mix of CA and corn starch), and flat file and modeling saw.
  - Fill the end of the tube so you have a solid rod.
  - File or sand the end flat, then create a bevel the circumference by rotating it against the file, held at an angle.
  - Saw a notch across the center, your basically making a screw head.
  - Us this as a "push master" to make a simple one part mold, pushing it into super sculpey (this worked best for me) or epoxy putty (or whatever else you can think of!).  Make a bunch so you can make multiple parts at a time.
  - Fill the molds.  Polyurethane resin would work great, but lacking that I have used Bondo polyester putty thinned a little with acetone or MEK.  Thinning it reduces the strength, but you don't need much strength for these.  Just fill them as best you can, and scrape off the excess so you have a relatively flat part.
  - After the putty/resin cures, remove the parts.  You can level the backs or thin them out by holding them down on a large flat file with your finger, and just dragging them toward the handle of the file.

Or you can just buy the darn things from HLJ of course! ;)
Animation Scale Models 4U 2.0
http://models4you.whoadude.com

aznbuddy

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Greebles are awesome!
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2005, 10:07:20 AM »
Thanks, Bawoo. Consider your techinique above copied and saved in my techniques archive.

And, um...I ended up buying them on HLJ. Man, I bought 6 or 7 mold and booster sets from HLJ and it's only gonna cost me around $20! HLJ is cool!

Since gas prices are so high now, I'd rather not drive anywhere to look for anything for this hobby.

Thanks! :D
y hovercraft is full of eels!

Traks

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 83
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
greebles
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2006, 09:34:51 PM »
To add more info on to this topic... I kept seeing the word greeble come up in the In-Progress and Gallery sections and didn't quite know what it meant. So, I did a search on yahoo and found an interesting site talking about greebles and greebling techniques on this site for 3-D drawings. For other n00bs on the forum like myself, I hope this helps even though it just for 3-D drawings.

ronin4122000

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 32
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Greebles are awesome!
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2006, 01:08:17 AM »
I know i've talked about this before but thought i'dmention it again. I bought these cutters (see links) for cutting circles they are really acurate for size and can cut through just about anything you would need them too, just give them a whack with a hammer. I got mine cheaper off e-bay then from these links but the first ones min go from 5mm to 1.5 inches. the 2nd mine came with 2mm 3mm and 4mm circle heads. although they also come in other shapes such as square, triangle and hearts.
Simply hold the punch over the plastic (or whatever) and hit with a hammer then push the disc out of the hole.

http://www.tooled-up.com/Product.asp?Referrer=IndexSite&PID=14705

http://scrapbookingsuppliesrus.com/product_info.php?products_id=875