Author Topic: technique of making feet  (Read 3523 times)

gundamxx1

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technique of making feet
« on: April 06, 2005, 07:13:53 AM »
Fichtenfoo, looking at your Cloud 9 suit truly amazes me.  The feet for example, are wonderfull.  From your in progress write up, I understand the method for the work, but for the top of the foot where you added the double notched piece on top and then blended it in I don't get it.  I don't have Milliput available to me where I'm at, but I ordered this stuff called Apoxiesculpt that I hope will provide good results.  I guess what I'm trying to say  is that I think it would be cool, if you had the time, to maybe make a short how to video on this particular technique and share it.  You called it katoki style? Anyways thanks for listening
Jonathan

Bawoo

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technique of making feet
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2005, 08:06:37 AM »
I don't know that he could have explained it much more clearly, but I'll try to clarify it for you...

He built the basic shapes out of sheet plastic; top, bottom, and sides.  The notched part on the top is just a very thin sheet with the notches cut out, glued to the thicker top piece, which add the recessed detail.  When he glued on the side pieces, he ended up with a stairstep seam between the original red foot part and the plastic sheet.  The putty just covers the seam between the sheet plastic side pieces and the original foot.  Glop the putty over the seam and sand smooth...is that the part you didn't get?
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FichtenFoo

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technique of making feet
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2005, 08:42:10 AM »
Quote from: "Bawoo"
I don't know that he could have explained it much more clearly, but I'll try to clarify it for you...

He built the basic shapes out of sheet plastic; top, bottom, and sides.  The notched part on the top is just a very thin sheet with the notches cut out, glued to the thicker top piece, which add the recessed detail.  When he glued on the side pieces, he ended up with a stairstep seam between the original red foot part and the plastic sheet.  The putty just covers the seam between the sheet plastic side pieces and the original foot.  Glop the putty over the seam and sand smooth...is that the part you didn't get?


Yep, that's pretty much it.

And as for videos... I don't have the time for that insanity. :wink:
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gundamxx1

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technique of making feet
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2005, 12:38:12 PM »
I get the process.  What I was trying to convey is how seamless and perfect the finished product turned out.  If it were me doing that mod, the side pieces would be misshapen, the top notched piece would be overflowing with glue and the putty would have terrific sanding scratches, all in all the piece would look bad, much less having to make two.    I learn well by actually seeing what is going on, vice just reading it.  Thats why I asked about a video.  thank  you.

FichtenFoo

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technique of making feet
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2005, 01:48:53 PM »
A video would mean that I'd have to make more feet for which I have no need or time for. Hence the insanity.  :lol:

If you're getting deep sanding scratches, you'll need to buff them out with a coat of thin putty and sanding film with a high grit like 400-600. It's all proactice though... the more you do it, the more you'll learn.
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tetsujin

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technique of making feet
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2005, 07:19:36 AM »
Quote from: "gundamxx1"
I get the process.  What I was trying to convey is how seamless and perfect the finished product turned out.  If it were me doing that mod, the side pieces would be misshapen, the top notched piece would be overflowing with glue and the putty would have terrific sanding scratches, all in all the piece would look bad, much less having to make two.


Here are some tips that may help you to make modifications like this more uniform.

First, design the alteration as fully as possible before you try building any of it.

For cutting out framework pieces from styrene, it can be helpful to use the computer: draw up your design on the computer, scale it to the proper size, and print it out - then use the printout as a cutting stencil of sorts.  (Glue the paper to the styrene, cut, then remove the paper.)

Start the work by building up the framework as uniformly as you can.  Check its correctness regularly.  Good ways to check its uniformity include taking photographs (digital or otherwise - seeing the part from a fixed perspective helps to eliminate some of your bias - and it makes it easier to invert or reorient the image, which is also good for helping you to avoid mentally "smoothing over" bits of what you see.  This is why drawing things upside-down is used as a drawing excercise - if you look at things right-side up your brain interprets them, and you tend to draw your interpretation.  If you look at things upside-down you don't interpret as readily, and so you'll see things you might otherwise miss.)

When the framework is on, planing down surfaces can be really easy.  The easiest way, IMO, is to fill the space with polyester putty, press a styrene plate against it, let the putty cure, and then remove the plate.  The result will be a smooth, flat surface that needs very little clean-up.

Both Foo's work and Bawoo's work have good examples of this kind of thing, and both are well-documented in stills.  I agree that a video could be incredibly helpful (and because I'm interested in teaching techniques like these, weak as my qualifications may be, I do want to do something like that at some point) but it really is a lot of work.  In the mean time, the best way you can learn to do this is by practicing it yourself.  Don't hestitate to share your progress, and ask for help if you need it.  Plenty of us just love to field questions like those.  That kind of structural work is the core of the hobby for me.
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Bawoo

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technique of making feet
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2005, 07:39:22 AM »
Sounds like we need a cameraman(woman). :)
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rvn85

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technique of making feet
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2005, 09:01:13 AM »
if you're too lazy to do it or dunno how to do it u can just purchase it off the net from akocreation.com