Author Topic: Recasting simple objects using Milliput  (Read 3937 times)

WhiteBase

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 176
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Recasting simple objects using Milliput
« on: July 25, 2006, 07:35:11 PM »
Just realised that I haven't posted this here. Hope this simple tutorial helps!

Hi, here are some step by step pics on recasting parts using milliput, which are quite self explanatory. I use baby powder as mold release, but I heard that lip balm works as well. Objects to be recasted must not have undercut or it will be locked into the mold, destroying your hard work.

Original part, spliced from leftover ball joints of my old kits


Press this part onto a block of milliput (along its plane of symmetry). Remember to coat both the part, and the milliput surface with baby powder. Wait for the milliput to fully cure.


Once fully cured, press another block of milliput onto the earlier block, with the original part still in place.


Voila... mold is ready. the part in the middle is the recasted part. Just put in a smallblock of milliput into the cavity , coat with talcum powder, and squeeze. You may need to repeatedly open up the molds, remove excess milliput, and squeeze again, until the shape is correct. tedious, but it works.. Extra tip, wait for the recasted item to fully cure, then pry it out of the mold using the leftover 'flesh' around the recasted part. This way you don't damage the actual part.


Here's another example:-


Notice the small hole in the corner of mold on the left. I intentially drilled this in to act as an escape for excess milliput. So when I squeeze the mold together, the excess milliput will be squeezed out like toothpaste. Also, when the part is cured, you can push the part out via this hole as well... dual function!


Final Recasted part with the flesh removed.


other sample:






Scarylion

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 49
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.scarylion.org
Recasting simple objects using Milliput
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2006, 03:07:54 AM »
Nice! how strong are the recast parts tho?
size=9]In one episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Chuck Norris replaced Carlton for one scene and nobody noticed.[/size]

Major Blah

  • Bloody Canadian
  • FFF Staff
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2387
  • Karma: 4
  • oink!
    • View Profile
    • SquintyEyes
Recasting simple objects using Milliput
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2006, 05:25:25 AM »
Milliput should be as strong as, if not stronger, than the original plastic.

Titan-ex

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 74
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Recasting simple objects using Milliput
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2006, 01:12:03 PM »
Any online stores you'd recommend in the US for ordering this stuff?

gamerabaenre

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 458
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Recasting simple objects using Milliput
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2006, 04:43:44 PM »
This place has it...
http://www.hobbyworks.com/default.cfm/Content/fullarticle/hs/Home/ID/294

I had once tried to order a different item from them that was listed as on order, however they were never able to get the item so they refunded my money.  *shrug*  I would suggest emailing them.

You also may want to break out your phone book and call your local hobby shops... I did that and found one near my work that carried the "yellow" miliput from the red label box.  I personally think it's a bit expensive to use as a viable casting method; but for general puttying purposes, it's decent.  It is comparable with tamiya epoxy putty quick type.

FichtenFoo

  • Model On!
  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10399
  • Karma: 17
  • 16 bits of fun
    • View Profile
    • http://www.fichtenfoo.com
Recasting simple objects using Milliput
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2006, 07:59:18 PM »
Thanks for posting this again WB. A great little tutorial. I would also suggest trying this with Magic Sculpt or Apoxy Sculpt. Both are much better epoxy putties than Miliput IMO.
Rust is beautiful.