Author Topic: Pre- and Post-Shading  (Read 28653 times)

July 25, 2006, 11:01:50 AM
Reply #20

oteebzo

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your airbrush should of came with a wrench that fits in to 2 flat spots on the head assembly. Use that, it should come off. What airbrush do youo have? Does you AB have a 2 piece head assmbly to it? Guess I should ask that first before telling you to wrench it off. :lol:  :D

July 25, 2006, 11:20:07 AM
Reply #21

FichtenFoo

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Remove the needle first. Otherwise you'll probably bend it.

July 26, 2006, 09:04:50 AM
Reply #22

Zoccoli

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Quote from: "oteebzo"
your airbrush should of came with a wrench that fits in to 2 flat spots on the head assembly. Use that, it should come off. What airbrush do youo have? Does you AB have a 2 piece head assmbly to it? Guess I should ask that first before telling you to wrench it off. :lol:  :D

If you were asking me, I have a Badger 200 single-action. The manual outright states that they machine-tightened the head, and that it isn't meant to be removed. I have no idea why, though. Just for laughs I did try to loosen it with vice grips (I always disassemble anything mechanical I get, to understand how it works), and all I accomplished was a nice big scar in the chrome plating.

July 26, 2006, 11:27:57 AM
Reply #23

gamerabaenre

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If you were asking me, I have a Badger 200 single-action.

Ok, that explains alot.  A single action airbrush is similar to using spray cans.  You have zero control over paint flow.  You will not be able to get fine lines as you would with a double action airbrush.

Single action airbrushes are really only good for spraying primers or top coats.  Any detail work such as shading, and such need to be done with a double action airbrush....  However, I'm sure if you practice enough, you may be able to learn to control the single action airbrush... but then again, it'll be no different than learning control with a spray can.

My suggestions and such from the above posts were made under the assumption that you were working with a double action airbrush.  Since it has been such a long time since I last used a single action airbrush, I cannot suggest anything to help you with your current situation.

July 26, 2006, 07:56:08 PM
Reply #24

Zoccoli

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Argh, I should have known. :( It was a gift and it's not that old, so it's really too soon to replace it just yet. I was a little disappointed that it was single-action when I received it, but whatever. I'll make do without for the time being. Thanks everybody!

September 24, 2006, 10:44:43 PM
Reply #25

T1000

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Be very careful when you are using the technique. 20% of White is only a gauge to use. What you really have to do is to mix the highlight colour to around that composition, and try it. You may have to repeat till you get the correct composition. Also, when the paint is gloss, it is VERY hard to see or notice any difference between the actual colour and the highlight. But by the time u see any, it may be too bright.  So the tip to this is perfect lighting
1. Have plenty of light, make sure there is no shadow
2. Use only WHITE light

Also a  thing to note here is:- gloss coat tends to make the colour darker, while flat coat will make the colour lighter. Furthermore, when you use this shading technique, the final flat coat may "split" the base colour and the highlight colour. This means that while doing the shading (on gloss surface), it may appear that the shading is just right. But after flat coat, the shade contrast suddenly stands out and ruin the subtle shading which we are trying to hard to get.. this is an example of that occurrence:

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c82/EatMeRaw_/DSC02259.jpg

See the dark shade on its legs? It is non-intentional and while on a glossy surface, it DOES NOT appear so bad..  :cry:

Last thing is : Use a 0.2mm airbrush to perform this kind of shading. Use low pressure. short distance and get the correct thinner-to-paint ratio.

---- NEW TRICKS ----
After messing around with a few kits, I have learnt a few new tricks  :P

One of which is known as the reverse shading technique. This technic is basically used for painting red colour.



Also, another interesting note about shading and highlighting. The highlite colour need not or cannot be always white. The main colour should be used to determine the highlight colour.

Red : Red + Yellow
Green : Green + Yellow
Orange : Orange + Yellow

These are only the few I knew...  8)

September 25, 2006, 05:44:28 AM
Reply #26

FichtenFoo

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Hmmm... You know, with your schematic, I find it better to apply the panel lines before the decals for a clean/shaded-look. This has 2 benefits. First you end up with 2 gloss layers for your decals which reduces the possibility of silvering. Second I've had trouble in the past around panel lines where decals overlap them of the ink/wash seeping under the decal and making a mess. If the wash is down, dry and under a gloss coat then that won't happen.

September 25, 2006, 05:23:50 PM
Reply #27

T1000

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Quote from: "FichtenFoo"
Hmmm... You know, with your schematic, I find it better to apply the panel lines before the decals for a clean/shaded-look. This has 2 benefits. First you end up with 2 gloss layers for your decals which reduces the possibility of silvering. Second I've had trouble in the past around panel lines where decals overlap them of the ink/wash seeping under the decal and making a mess. If the wash is down, dry and under a gloss coat then that won't happen.


I see.. I used this layers because I wanted the decals to "fuse" in with the other colours, meaning that the wash may stain it and make it look as though the decals are part of the surface and not some "stickers", if you know what I mean. So far, I have had no trouble as to the wash or panel lines seaping into the decals, but I will bare your suggestion in mind in case the panel lines are close to the decals.  8)

November 07, 2006, 07:13:16 PM
Reply #28

bender222

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how do you obtain the shaded look on black?

November 07, 2006, 07:22:57 PM
Reply #29

FichtenFoo

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Use black as the base color then shade with a charcoal gray. Personally, I RARELY use black on a kit. The exception being decals, tires and certain parts on my Rick Dias.

November 09, 2006, 09:23:02 AM
Reply #30

tehmarken

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For doing a wash for the panel lines, what's a good ratio for paint:thinner?
And for enamel paint, rubbing alcohol is a good thinner, right?

November 09, 2006, 09:36:16 AM
Reply #31

gamerabaenre

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Quote from: "tehmarken"
For doing a wash for the panel lines, what's a good ratio for paint:thinner?
And for enamel paint, rubbing alcohol is a good thinner, right?


The consistency of a wash solution is close to water.  I usually use a dot of enamel to 1 eye dropper full of thinner.  Enamel paint is oil based, you need to use an oil based thinner.  Best to just get some thinner that is the same brand as your paints.  Hardware store brands of thinner may be too strong.  Alcohol is not a good thinner for enamels.  Alcohol is a good for thinning acrylic based paints.

November 09, 2006, 09:51:19 AM
Reply #32

tehmarken

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Ok.

And I just mixed up enamel and acrylic in my head, enamel thinner for enamel paint duh :roll:

December 01, 2006, 09:38:54 AM
Reply #33

Maschinen Krueger

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Quote from: "gamerabaenre"
Quote
If you were asking me, I have a Badger 200 single-action.

Ok, that explains alot.  A single action airbrush is similar to using spray cans.  You have zero control over paint flow. You will not be able to get fine lines as you would with a double action airbrush.


I've used a Badger 200 for the past 20 years. I find it a lot easier and less problematic that the double action aribrush I used, which now collects dust. I use a M and F tip and needle. I find that with proper paint control and PSI, I can achieve fine lines for preshading and post shading, and subtle fading for highlighting. Every model I have painted has been with this airbrush.

I'm not saying it's perfect, I wouldn't use it for mottled camo on a 1/72 aircraft. The thing is old and I find myself wanting finer and finer paint control, but to say it's no better than a spray can, well... that's just not right

modedit: please, don't talk down to people
I wonder about the guy that can sit through a David Lynch movie and say, "I saw that coming."

Krueger's Krieger

December 01, 2006, 10:30:25 AM
Reply #34

gamerabaenre

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Well, my comparison was based off my experience with using a single action airbrush.  Press down on the trigger, paint and air come out.  Of course this was before I had any regulation device on the airflow, and the brush was really old, 15-18 years that I picked up for a couple of bucks back then.  But my assessment is that it worked just like a spray can.  Perhaps if I had the actual airbrush brand and model, proper regulation setup, wasn't a complete noob with airbrushing - my answer would probably be different.

modedit: no flaming!

December 07, 2006, 06:42:26 PM
Reply #35

bender222

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I dont really understand the highliting part. I get the shadow and the base layers. where would you mainly use highlights? In the center of the larger peices?

December 07, 2006, 07:17:45 PM
Reply #36

zerobxu

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Quote from: "bender222"
I dont really understand the highliting part. I get the shadow and the base layers. where would you mainly use highlights? In the center of the larger peices?

I know it's showing as "out of stock", but you might do well to track down this mook: "I Love Gunpla". It does a very nice job--through pictures--of explaining the shading process.
"The parrot is the bird that talks the most and flies the worst."
-The Wright Brothers

December 07, 2006, 08:29:38 PM
Reply #37

bender222

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Quote from: "zerobxu"
Quote from: "bender222"
I dont really understand the highliting part. I get the shadow and the base layers. where would you mainly use highlights? In the center of the larger peices?

I know it's showing as "out of stock", but you might do well to track down this mook: "I Love Gunpla". It does a very nice job--through pictures--of explaining the shading process.

--Thanks

December 07, 2006, 08:40:19 PM
Reply #38

zerobxu

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You're welcome. If you're serious about it, you might try emailing akadot retail. I've had them special order mooks for me before. They said that they have a little trouble tracking down Hobby Japan materials, but they've carried them in the past. And they do encourage inquiries.
"The parrot is the bird that talks the most and flies the worst."
-The Wright Brothers

February 24, 2009, 11:40:05 PM
Reply #39

Tuxedo-Zaku

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Are there any tables showing what colors should be pre-shaded with what?  I noticed a few in this thread, but moar would be helpful.  Also, how do you add shading to white?  Would it be a very light grey undercoat, followed by the white?