Author Topic: Putty Questions  (Read 55230 times)

January 16, 2007, 07:02:28 AM
Reply #40

GlauG

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Right, having read this topic I persuaded a friend in the US to bring some Aves Apoxie and Magic Sculpt over for me, but I'm not massively blown away by the Apoxie as of yet.  Having read around a little online, it's apparrantly a lot firmer and easier to work with if it's left for about 20 mins to half an hour after mixing.  However, having become very used to Tamiya putty, I'm having a hard time working with it as it's not very sticky.  Does the tackiness increase if you leave it to set a bit before trying to work with it? It certainly sticks well while curing/once cured, as I've used it a little on Infinite Justice and it's performed admirably, but is there a way of getting it to be more sticky while working with it?  I've mixed various epoxy putties in the past, maybe I'll try mixing it with Tamiya and seeing how that goes...

Also, is Magic Sculpt at all different in this regard, ie: is it more/less sticky?  It's a bit more expensive, so I have less of it and I'm not too keen to waste too much playing around to get to know it.

January 16, 2007, 07:17:10 AM
Reply #41

FichtenFoo

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Are you using it as a seam filler or as a sculpting putty? For sculpting it's fantastic. It's not going to "stick" to plastic well though if you're just building up bulk on a smooth part... how I get around that is to either put down CA first (messy) or later after popping the cured aves part off and before any clean-up.

January 16, 2007, 11:17:35 AM
Reply #42

GlauG

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I've been using it for a bit of both, but I was using it for bulking out some plasticard parts and it just wouldn't stay.  I'll try letting it dry a little and burring up the plastic some, and see if that helps.  It does smooth a LOT nicer than any other putty I've used, it must be said.  Cheers for the advice!

January 16, 2007, 11:23:55 AM
Reply #43

FichtenFoo

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Burring won't do much I'm afraid to keep it permenantly attached. You'll wanna pop it off after and CA it down into place for the best hold. It is great stuff though. Try using it in conjunction with Superglue + Talcum Powder (SGT).

February 07, 2007, 11:41:18 AM
Reply #44

Redcomet

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I'm new to the scratch build seen and i am looking for a building material. I seen everyone use it like it is Sculpting clay to cover large gaps that putty cant cover. I don't Know if it is a different type of putty that they are using or a quick dry clay.

February 11, 2007, 10:57:48 AM
Reply #45

riccardo

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Hi,
recetnly we dicussed the use of Bondo glazing and spots putty. Looking at the pictures of the last Fichten's work i think he used as well.  Bondo it's an automotive putty it comes with the viscotsity of  a cream, it can be sanded and painted easily. Its color is red  brown so you can't really avoid to notice it. This is a big big plus for it.
After realizing that basically it makes the same job as the tamiya basic putty and 125g costs 3.5$ it became my favorite putty.
Here is how it appears and the consistency of the raw product:

but you can thin it with Mr Color thinner or the leveling thinner. Bondomelts the plastic a little bit as the tamiya putty. you can thin it as much as you want, depends on the use you are going to do. usually I use this ratio in volume (well approximatvely) 3Thinner:2Bondo. If I have to fill very small pin-holes it can be higher (more thinner).
here is the crea how it looks after thinning 3T:2B

with this I filled some holes in the Fatima from FSS  i'm working on. Bondo srhinks and since the solution is 3 parts of thinner you can expect about 60% volume loss, so put it in excess:

after sanding the pinholes and some other casting problems (the ifgure is a recast) are almost ok. As you can see you can see where the putty has gone:


it works well as a gap filler but also for larger works. In this case I let it cure for one week, then if needed i fill a little more. For minor works 1 to 6 hours is fine, depending on how much you thinned it and how thick is the layer of putty.
Hope that my experience is useful. You may find Bondo in automotive stores or in automotive departments in major chains (I don't want to name the one I'm referring to since I have a very little simpathy for the company).

ciao
ric

February 11, 2007, 11:18:22 AM
Reply #46

Major Blah

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I've used Bondo glazing putty before too, it's really smooth and easy to apply, I recommend many thin layers instead of a thick layer, as it can strink a lot and might not cure as well.

February 11, 2007, 03:48:54 PM
Reply #47

Marc

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Would you also recommend it for plastic kits and plastic sheets or is the melting too harsh?
MB, what d'you mean by "strink"?

February 11, 2007, 03:55:15 PM
Reply #48

Major Blah

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I used it on plastic, it's not too agressive.  Definitely worth a try.

What I mean by "shrink" is that if you put a big blob of said putty in a seam/hole and roughly shaped it to the contour when it's wet, it would depress/shrink when it's dried off.  At least that was my experience.

February 11, 2007, 04:12:44 PM
Reply #49

riccardo

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yes it shrinks a lot! About aggressivity with thin layers and mr color thinner i had no problem
Try it and you will never go back.

ric

February 27, 2007, 12:04:29 AM
Reply #50

HKR

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So I have a quick question about Tamiya basic putty.  I've been using it to fill gaps and holes, and I'm almost done sanding all the parts down and getting them ready for priming.  I'd like to give the parts a quick bath and scrub them with a tooth brush before I prime them though.  Will the puttied parts be okay in warm soapy water, or should I clean them differently?

February 27, 2007, 08:34:37 AM
Reply #51

mrmaigo

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riccardo,
I've been using Bondo's "Professional Glazing & Spot Putty" for my K, I'm guessing the a difference between that and just Glazing & Spot Putty is you have to add the hardener too 'Professional'. The 'Professional' is fine for what I'm doing but you have to mix it before doing spots because it won't just harden on its own (I tried, I did NOT work). Up till now I didn't know they had a ready to use tube.

February 27, 2007, 09:14:47 AM
Reply #52

FichtenFoo

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Quote from: "HKR"
So I have a quick question about Tamiya basic putty.  I've been using it to fill gaps and holes, and I'm almost done sanding all the parts down and getting them ready for priming.  I'd like to give the parts a quick bath and scrub them with a tooth brush before I prime them though.  Will the puttied parts be okay in warm soapy water, or should I clean them differently?


Not sure... you'll just have to test it out. It's better to clean the parts before doing work though.

February 27, 2007, 09:27:25 AM
Reply #53

HKR

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Quote from: "FichtenFoo"
Quote from: "HKR"
So I have a quick question about Tamiya basic putty.  I've been using it to fill gaps and holes, and I'm almost done sanding all the parts down and getting them ready for priming.  I'd like to give the parts a quick bath and scrub them with a tooth brush before I prime them though.  Will the puttied parts be okay in warm soapy water, or should I clean them differently?


Not sure... you'll just have to test it out. It's better to clean the parts before doing work though.


The parts were cleaned beforehand, I'm just anal about making sure any sort of dust or particle is gone from the surface before priming.

Looks like I'll try it with a sprue and find out myself.

March 13, 2007, 05:55:51 PM
Reply #54

Haseo

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i got some Tamiys putty but i dont really no how to use it to fill seams can some one be kind enough to make a guild or just tell me how to use it -thanks  and yes i have read the whole thread and i still dont get it.
hmm.. no one ever replys to my posts do i kill threads or something?!?!??!<br />mod edit: yes... yes you do<br />

March 13, 2007, 06:06:08 PM
Reply #55

FichtenFoo

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If there is a visible seam after gluing and sanding then apply the Tamiya putty with a q-tip, old razor, or some other implement. Make sure it gets into the gap and don't apply it too thick. Let cure then sand flush.

March 13, 2007, 08:45:31 PM
Reply #56

Haseo

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hmm.. no one ever replys to my posts do i kill threads or something?!?!??!<br />mod edit: yes... yes you do<br />

March 14, 2007, 11:28:14 AM
Reply #57

amessier

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Does the color of putty matter once its primed?(green,white,red,ect..)
Isn't that going to be covered up?

 

March 14, 2007, 12:06:49 PM
Reply #58

oteebzo

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It does not matter because all of it will be gray or white once you prime.

April 10, 2007, 09:53:51 AM
Reply #59

machinedragon

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i hate digging up old topics , but has anyone used mr.hobby white putty ? , i just got some thanks to local hobby clearance sales , considering other puttys , but basiclly are most putties equal ? or are there some that are stellar ?

im a noob when it comes to scratchbuilding gunpla , but a full sized atx computer case :) and i know bondo grey in thin coats then a last of glazing putty red, then green finishing putty (like bondo but slightly different )

i mean for  puttying seams , is it as simple as glue inspect and add a little putty in the crack , or is it more like a sandwich , put a little putty on both sides of seam , and CA glue on the nubs , and wait to cure

and i know im a inquisitive person so ill cut any more questions to this one
i know bondo , ( and assuming other 2 parts ) can be rushed by adding more hardener , but how long are the cure times on the different putties , ( there are soo manny)  i just want one i can work on a part , and get it done :)