Author Topic: Airbrushing and paint  (Read 2312 times)

June 27, 2006, 06:04:43 PM
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crazedpanda

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I was airbrushing today (my first time airbrushing a model) and pretty much used up 2/3 a bottle of Tamiya flat white (23 mL size) on half a model  - the HG 1/100 Tallgeese III. I'm painting it based off the colors on the box, so more than 1/2 the model is white. I was wondering if I am wasting too much paint or something when I'm airbrushing. I skewered all the pieces, but when I paint I pick up each individual skewer so that I don't get overspray on the other pieces. I'm trying to follow the FF airbrush guide and apply it on in layers with the ratio of 3 parts paint: 2 parts alcohol. I was only able to get like 2 coats on the pieces using 2/3 of the bottle. I have a feeling that I may be doing something wrong.

June 27, 2006, 06:50:37 PM
Reply #1

FichtenFoo

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Heh... sounds like my MG Ez8. That was my first fully airbrushed MG. Basically I did not prime and ended up using a lot of white paint trying to cover up the yellowish plastic. Feel your dry paint. Is it rough? Mine was. What I learned over time is to prime first, thin 50/50 Tamiya/91% alcohol (not water), and not pull back the trigger all the way on my dual action airbrushes. Be as percise as possible when spraying avoiding overspray. It helps to put a colored piece of paper where you spray to see how much overspray you're getting with the white.

Aside from that, Tamiya White is thicker than other colors so it takes some getting used to. Try mixing a tiny bit of gray into it so that it's not 100% white, but 95-90%. That looks nicer and is easier to see when spraying.

June 27, 2006, 08:46:12 PM
Reply #2

crazedpanda

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I checked out the surface of the paint, and it feels as smooth as flat paint should be. I followed your tutorial and pretty much added 3 parts paint to 2 parts thinner; would it be better to go with the 50/50? I think the problem is the overspray since I applied the paint in relatively thin layers so that it would come out smooth. How do you be precise, avoid overspray, and not spray so close that the paint will splatter?

Also, I've already painted two layers on some of the parts and ran out after one layer on the rest of the parts that needed white. Would it still be OK to just spray the 95-90% white over the rest (after I get some more paint) or would the color be slightly different because of the difference in number of coats?

I also wanted to make sure that even though multiple pieces get skewered at once, they are all painted individually, right?

Thanks for the tips though FF.

June 28, 2006, 06:16:07 AM
Reply #3

pu_rplecow

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I hate painting white, its difficult to see and all. I only knew the paint was going on when the orange peel texture appeared...  Grey primer helps!

If you want to prevent the paint from splattering/spluttering out you should thin it down more.

If your paint gets too thin and starts running all over the model you shld lower down the psi or mix in somemore paint to thicken it abit. lowering the psi helps alot with the overspray. Test it on something before hitting your model with it. a psi of 10-15 is more than enough for thin paint. Dry it after every thin coat like in the FF AB tutorial by using the AB to blow on it.

Another thing is the ratios are a rough guide, because sometimes paint doesn't come in the exact thickness so-to-speak. It might have dried a little making it thicker than it should have been (esp. true for old paints or paints that the shop stored for very long). Try to make it to the consistency of milk... and remember to bubble it abit in the airbrush (if you are using an AB with the cup on top) by covering the nozzle, releasing the air and pulling back n the trigger.

You shld post some in progress pictures! Then the community here can give you pointers along the way!
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I'm trying to decrease my talk : model ratio.
Less talk more model!

June 28, 2006, 08:43:06 AM
Reply #4

FichtenFoo

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Yeah, paint one part at a time.