Author Topic: Tools for sanding  (Read 5791 times)

June 25, 2006, 06:22:04 PM
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crazedpanda

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Hi, I'm new to building Gundam models and I ran into some trouble during the sanding. I am currently working on a HG 1/100 Tallgeese III (I decided to start out with a simpler, cheaper model). I did not have that much trouble using a sanding stick with 400 grit sandpaper and Tamiya basic putty for most of the seams. However, on the bottom of the foot is where I had trouble with sanding down the excess plastic when I glued the two halves together. The places that I am trying to sand have a lot of detail around them such as raised or recessed areas. I am wondering if there are any good tools or ways of sanding those areas.

June 25, 2006, 07:56:51 PM
Reply #1

pu_rplecow

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Use a chisel type hobby knife to scrape, other than that, theres not much option. careful sanding will do it.

this thread will help you out. I know you probably have done this but before anyone says it to you... do a search..  :) and after that google it! We're all here to help if you realy can't find it!
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June 25, 2006, 09:54:41 PM
Reply #2

crazedpanda

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I've read that thread already and have done a search on the forums for anything that has to do with sanding. I've tried using a hobby knife to scrape off as much as I can but I was just wondering if there is a better way than "careful sanding". I'm still not sure if there are any better tools or if a tool can be made similar to the sanding stick. Just to clarify, the area I'm trying to sand is in the middle of the bottom of the foot and there are quite a few rectangular beveled areas on the bottom of the foot as well as two semi circular areas.

June 26, 2006, 01:46:46 AM
Reply #3

fulcy

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June 26, 2006, 03:52:00 AM
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crazedpanda

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Yeah...I actually read that a while ago as well. I might try that out. Thanks for the tips guys!

June 26, 2006, 04:09:14 AM
Reply #5

pu_rplecow

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haha.. someone's done his homework! Sometime whenyoui hit a wall like that, it might actually be easier to just sand everything away and make new details. just a thought for you. Sometimes sanding is just physically impossible. Some japanese modellers just replace teh soles of the feet with a pla plate with some cut patterns on it.
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I'm trying to decrease my talk : model ratio.
Less talk more model!

June 26, 2006, 04:24:41 AM
Reply #6

crazedpanda

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Oh, ok. It's just that I was apprehensive about doing that since I'm a beginner and did not want to try too many things to start out (This is my first model that I'm sanding, puttying, and painting).

June 26, 2006, 06:34:36 PM
Reply #7

crazedpanda

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Just an update....good news! I took a trip to the local HobbyTown and found this tool by Squadron that's called a "Seam Scraper" and works really well. Costs about $10, but I would say it's worth it. The tip of it is about 1/4 inch wide and is good for small areas.

I was also finally able to start airbrushing today and I just wanted to thank you FF for your excellent tutorials. The only thing is that one of the pieces fell and some of the paint came off so I will have to repaint that piece tomorrow, lol. Oh yeah...so when the piece dropped and a bit of the paint came off, would it be better to just strip the paint, sand down that portion, or just paint right over it?

June 26, 2006, 09:12:22 PM
Reply #8

pu_rplecow

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paint over - can see a patch after. The finish will not be smooth -  least troublesome

sand down - You'll still see the diff in colour because the already painted areas will look darker and thicker - abit troublesome.

Strip everything - If the plastic has a gouged out mark or something that needs more sanding and re priming and repainting - best
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I'm trying to decrease my talk : model ratio.
Less talk more model!

June 27, 2006, 04:01:40 AM
Reply #9

Doctor Seleski

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I have found that cutting up emery boards into long strips can be useful.  That way you can get in around details and ther are several different grits.  There is a company that sells sanding sticks and that is all they are.