Author Topic: Separating parts after they are built?  (Read 4325 times)

OmegaZEROCustom

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Separating parts after they are built?
« on: March 22, 2006, 11:17:38 PM »
So, with the announcement of the 1/100 Infinite Justice coming in May, my interest in the Destiny 1/100's has been renewed. My problem is that since the Strike Freedom had come out last Summer, I have since started to airbrush my kits instead of simply snapping them together and using a Gundam Marker to do minor color details.

Since my plan will be to airbrush the Infinite Justice kit, I'd liek to try and bring my Destiny kits, and eventually my SEED and Wing kits up to the higher quality of them being airbrushed. My problem is that unlike my newer MGs and HGUC's, I didn't do the technique of slicing the pegs at an angle to help get them apart after a prebuild (since I never did a prebuild).

I'm wondering if anyone has suggestions on how I can separate the parts without doing much damage. I don't mine some knicks along the seams since I'll be gluing them and sealing the seam lines, but I don't want to risk greater damage than that.

Does anyone have an idea on how I can get these things apart without too much trouble?

fulcy

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2006, 03:37:23 AM »
Welcome to the forums.  I deal with this alot - I'm kinda lazy, and I like cheaper kits, so I tend to watch ebay for built gundam kits and buy those, since they go relatively cheaply, and it saves me the time of having to cut the parts from the sprues and assemble them.  But, it does lead to disassembly - taking armor off, etc.  Best way I've found, is to use an exacto, and slide it into the seam, and start to pry the two parts apart - but be very careful, and don't do just one side.  You basically start on one side, pry it a little, then go to the opposite side, and pry an equal amount.  Now look at the part - is it coming apart uniformly?  Is there a side that is still fully mated together?  If so, that's the spot where you pry next - and then just continue going around the seam between the parts, prying a little and checking your progress.  Hope this helps!

StormKat

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2006, 05:17:05 AM »
Fulcy's right.  The most important thing is to take your time and be deliberate and patient.  If you try to rush it, you'll get more than just a nick.  I've got the scars on my fingertips to prove it.  :D
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Captain Obvious

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2006, 12:50:55 PM »
And it helps if the plastic, or at least the room your in, is somewhat warm.  I took apart a model when it was cold, and the plastic pegs snapped very easily.  It seemed much more pliable when I did it in a warm room.  But if you do break any peices, since you're airbrushing them anyways, it's not much of a problem if you have to glue them back together.
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fulcy

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2006, 01:23:35 PM »
Quote from: "Captain Obvious"
And it helps if the plastic, or at least the room your in, is somewhat warm.  I took apart a model when it was cold, and the plastic pegs snapped very easily.  It seemed much more pliable when I did it in a warm room.  But if you do break any peices, since you're airbrushing them anyways, it's not much of a problem if you have to glue them back together.


Agreed - most plastics become more brittle as the temperature decreases - not so much that it's hazardous to handle the models in a cold environment, but enough that it's easier to stress pegs when you are taking it apart...

OmegaZEROCustom

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2006, 04:07:39 PM »
Great, thanks for the advice. I'll give that a shot in the next few days.

Also, along these same lines since I noticed it today while looking at my different kits, like my Gundam X kit. I had glued the head together using superglue (Krazy Glue to be exact) bceause one of the pegs hadn't been molded properly so I cut it off and glued the seam to keep the back of the head together. Since I want to go back and redo this one as well, I need to know how I can dissolve the glue without harm to the plastic. I do plan to soak the parts in 409 since stuff like the cannon wings have that chrome on them. Is there any way to remove the glue without destroying the plastic, or would I be better off picking up new kits for thoise that have been glued? My Aegis has to be replaced because the arm peg was broken after falling from my shelf, and I want to do a reorder on all the replacement kits I might need all at once, but if I can remove the glue without damage, I'd rather save the money.

Thanks again for the advice about how to split the parts.

Captain Obvious

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2006, 04:17:45 PM »
I think you're out of luck on the head.  Superglue melts the plastic together, so where ever you glued is now one continuous piece of plastic.  As far as I know you can't do anything about that short of cutting it with a razor saw.  I could be wrong about this, but I'd suggest just buying new parts or kits.
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fulcy

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2006, 04:33:17 PM »
Actually, superglue doesn't melt the plastic together - you can get a super glue dissolver at your local hobby shop, that may or may not work (I've never used it, so I can't attest to it).  The glue your thinking about is plastic cement - most of them are toluene based, and and they melt the plastic and besically weld the two parts into one piece...

OmegaZEROCustom

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2006, 05:22:41 PM »
Yeah, I know the parts aren't fused since there is still a blatant seamline and a gap from where I cut it badly since I used to use nail clippers before getting a better tool. That gap, while not big, would probably have filled in had the plastic melted like it does using other stuff, like the Tamiya cement.

In any case, thanks for the suggestion Fulcy. I'll try and hunt some of that stuff down online, since I don't have a hobby shop in town. If it does melt the plastic, I'll just have to end up replacing the kit.

Red Comet

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2006, 07:03:07 PM »
Another method is to shave the pegs down a little when you build. If you reduce the peg size by around 1/3 to 1/2 it makes the parts easier to pull apart because the pegs will not be packed into the hole tightly.

Only do this though if you plan to pull it apart, glue and paint. Alot of the time when I put together kits for test fits, I reduce the pegs too much and the parts don't hold together well, but since I glue and paint everything, it doesn't really matter.  :D

OmegaZEROCustom

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Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2006, 07:50:15 PM »
Thanks Red Comet. I have been doing that with my Master Grades during the prebuilds, but these Destiny models are from 6+ months ago before I was airbrushing or anything. At the time, I was using Gundam Markers and just snapping them all together, and I hadn't planned to repaint them. If it weren't for the seams, I'd just paint them, but I need to seal the seams as well.

Kaus

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Re: Separating parts after they are built?
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2006, 03:05:00 AM »
Quote from: "OmegaZEROCustom"
So, with the announcement of the 1/100 Infinite Justice coming in May, my interest in the Destiny 1/100's has been renewed. My problem is that since the Strike Freedom had come out last Summer, I have since started to airbrush my kits instead of simply snapping them together and using a Gundam Marker to do minor color details.

Since my plan will be to airbrush the Infinite Justice kit, I'd liek to try and bring my Destiny kits, and eventually my SEED and Wing kits up to the higher quality of them being airbrushed. My problem is that unlike my newer MGs and HGUC's, I didn't do the technique of slicing the pegs at an angle to help get them apart after a prebuild (since I never did a prebuild).

I'm wondering if anyone has suggestions on how I can separate the parts without doing much damage. I don't mine some knicks along the seams since I'll be gluing them and sealing the seam lines, but I don't want to risk greater damage than that.

Does anyone have an idea on how I can get these things apart without too much trouble?



Seperate parts in warm water also help. Used your nails !