Author Topic: Mr. Sufacer and Primer Questions (post 'em here)  (Read 105887 times)

January 02, 2010, 08:59:17 AM
Reply #200

FichtenFoo

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Can I thin Mr. Surfacer with Mr. Color Leveling Thinner?
« Last Edit: January 02, 2010, 08:59:22 AM by FichtenFoo »

January 02, 2010, 03:23:23 PM
Reply #201

mvm3897

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Yup.  Thats what I use.  It will come out smooth as a baby's bottom, if it's not to hot outside.
SNIFFING RESIN DUST IS FUN!!!!!!

January 03, 2010, 09:57:57 PM
Reply #202

mtomczek

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I personally just use regular Mr. Color Thinner, as the Mr. Surfacer doesn't really need the retardant that is in the leveling thinner.

June 09, 2010, 07:08:16 PM
Reply #203

davetk

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Just wondering about priming. I am currently priming a model and I was wondering if I should not be able to see the orginal colour of the plastic when I prime.

I am priming while the parts are on the runner and I was wondering if it is ok to use the Mr Hobby primer (jar) to do touch ups on spur marks.

June 09, 2010, 09:26:54 PM
Reply #204

mvm3897

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It's not necesary to cover the colored plastic completely.  It is a good ide to do so if you are going to paint it another color other than the plastic underneath ohterwise you will get a color cast of the plastic underneath the primer.  Also it depends on if you are trying to fill scratches or just give the paint something better to hold on to.
I usually just cover the part until I cant tell what the original color was.  Just do it in several thin coats to cut down on build up.
SNIFFING RESIN DUST IS FUN!!!!!!

February 16, 2012, 12:46:21 PM
Reply #205

Bhm

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I've tried Vallejo primer on a couple of figures and painted on top of it. The problem is that both the paint and the primer rubs off quite easily and doesn't stand even basic handling. The primer I've used is the acrylic primer that I've sprayed via my own airbrush.

Well, it sucks balls and I have a couple of projects on hold because of this. Is there any decent primer that adheres like crazy and can withstand handling that I can spray on using my airbrush? I need it primary for white metal/pewter figures. Is mr.surfacer the way to go?

Oh, and I've tried washing with ammonia based window cleaner and brushing with detergent. I even ran some sprues through the dishwasher to make sure cleaning wasn't the issue.

February 16, 2012, 12:54:34 PM
Reply #206

Zircor

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I've tried Vallejo primer on a couple of figures and painted on top of it. The problem is that both the paint and the primer rubs off quite easily and doesn't stand even basic handling. The primer I've used is the acrylic primer that I've sprayed via my own airbrush.

Well, it sucks balls and I have a couple of projects on hold because of this. Is there any decent primer that adheres like crazy and can withstand handling that I can spray on using my airbrush? I need it primary for white metal/pewter figures. Is mr.surfacer the way to go?

Oh, and I've tried washing with ammonia based window cleaner and brushing with detergent. I even ran some sprues through the dishwasher to make sure cleaning wasn't the issue.

There's a Mr. Metal Primer that's supposed to work pretty good on metal stuff.  I got some to use on aftermarket metal Gunpla parts, but haven't had a chance to use it yet.  As far as handling, I've used just about all of the other Mr Color primers (on plastic) as well as Tamiya primers and haven't had problems with them coming off at all.

February 16, 2012, 08:30:09 PM
Reply #207

thejurasikfrank

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I've tried Vallejo primer on a couple of figures and painted on top of it. The problem is that both the paint and the primer rubs off quite easily and doesn't stand even basic handling. The primer I've used is the acrylic primer that I've sprayed via my own airbrush.

Well, it sucks balls and I have a couple of projects on hold because of this. Is there any decent primer that adheres like crazy and can withstand handling that I can spray on using my airbrush? I need it primary for white metal/pewter figures. Is mr.surfacer the way to go?

Oh, and I've tried washing with ammonia based window cleaner and brushing with detergent. I even ran some sprues through the dishwasher to make sure cleaning wasn't the issue.

I used to have that kind of problem when I was painting miniatures. Sadly, the only real solution I found was : NO HANDLING.  :bag: I know I know it kinda suck but hey, I had the same problem you have: pealing. :yucky:
I used to stick the miniature on a bottle of paint of a color I knew I wouldn't use and hold the bottle instead of the subject. As for primer, the hell with'em. On lead miniatures, I didn't find anything that would resist manipulation.
Still, to make the colors more vivid you need some sort of primerish base. For exemple, oranges, reds and yellows on pewter NEED a white primer base, if not you'll be applying a crazy amount of layers to get a decent base coat. What I would do was simply thinning white, grey or black (depending on the base color) 50/50 with water and applying that to the figure.
Once my base coat was done, I would seal the whole thing with 2 light coats of flat varnish  (can't remember the brand).
Oh, btw, I was using primarily Citadel paints.
Hope this helps.
Cheers
What a piece of junk!

February 22, 2012, 01:04:34 AM
Reply #208

Major Williams

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Best primer on the market in my humble opinion is Plamo Colour's gray primer.

Flat, even coat the first time, if you thin it properly (2 part thinner: 1 part primer), and you can handle it after it dries.
Check out my blog for my latest projects and tutorials - http://majorwilliams.blogspot.com

March 21, 2012, 11:40:52 PM
Reply #209

Bhm

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Thanks for the feedback, guys!

I just found what I was looking for: Alclad 2's gray primer.
It's awesome. It sticks like friggin' crazy and is quite hard to rub off. Sure, it stinks to high hell but I use a mask  anyway so I don't care. It's also available in a clear version which looks odd but is just as good. The only drawback for me is that the airbrush cleaning is a bitch with Alclad's products. Oh, and it eats through my vinyl gloves but I'm still happy with it.

July 02, 2012, 03:50:42 PM
Reply #210

gtex

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Hi guys.so i want to do a candy coat finish for my kit mg sinanju to be specific.And i have read that preping and priming is the key to get the best finish possible.So my question is do i need to prime the whole part with 400 and 800 grit sandpaper and then priming it?if so would that give me a smooth finish?since i have sanded the part with 800 grit and leave scratches on it..Will the primer cover it up?and after a prime the piece would i go over it and wet sand it with 800 grit and 1000grit?will it remove the primer and do i have to reprime it? I am using mr surfacer 1000 and 1200. Pardon me for my english i am not a native english speaker..

July 02, 2012, 08:53:58 PM
Reply #211

Will Vale

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1000 grit paper is quite aggressive, it won't take off the primer in one pass but it will go through it fairly quickly. I'd suggest wet sanding the pieces with 1000 grit before priming, then very very lightly with 1000 grit after the primer is on and maybe follow with 2000 grit. It depends how well the paint goes on as well - if you get orange peel you'll have to sand that out before continuing. A little bit of tooth to the primer isn't necessarily bad since it helps the paint grip.

After that I like to sand the colour coat with 2000 grit paper and then polish with Tamiya fine and finish compounds, which gives a decent but not perfect glossy finish. I think including 4000 grit paper or a coarser polish would give a better result.

Be aware that even with fine grits the sanding and polishing can cut through the paint and show the primer underneath. For kits in self-coloured plastic it *may* be better not to prime at all and then paint in the same colour as the primer - that way you won't polish through to white or grey. You do risk having translucent parts though depending on how heavy your colour coat is, so YMMV.

I'll try and take a picture later of a part I've just painted this way so you can see if it's good enough or not :)

[edit:] found this one I did earlier - I thought this was quite a good finish, but if you look close-up you can see dimpling in the paint suggesting it needed more sanding because it didn't level perfectly.


click for bigger

I've just been back to look at some more shiny paint I did this week which I thought looked *great* to the naked eye - shinier than the sub above - but the macro lens says it's still pretty rough :(

HTH,

Will
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 02:07:35 AM by Will Vale »

July 03, 2012, 01:49:22 PM
Reply #212

gtex

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will it be the same process when im using gloss black and then mr color super metallic and then clear color of my choice?

July 04, 2012, 03:55:29 PM
Reply #213

Will Vale

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I think so, but it's not something I've done - I know people recommend spraying Alclad over gloss black.

July 05, 2012, 03:16:03 AM
Reply #214

Jiloo

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You don't have to clear coat Gunze SM. It's very resistant paint, much more than Alklad.
The better surface paint, the better upper layer.

Me myself using Gaia Surfacer EVO Black uder metallic paint's  that's enough for me.
But will propably use high gloss black under chrome.

July 07, 2012, 09:09:11 PM
Reply #215

gtex

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You don't have to clear coat Gunze SM. It's very resistant paint, much more than Alklad.
The better surface paint, the better upper layer.

Me myself using Gaia Surfacer EVO Black uder metallic paint's  that's enough for me.
But will propably use high gloss black under chrome.
i am not going to top coat it..im putting a clear color over it like clear yellow over mr super metallic super chrome.

July 08, 2012, 03:36:01 AM
Reply #216

Jiloo

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Now I get it.
Had the same idea some time ago and even put some test :)
Unfortunately I throw the test results so cannot show you the pics :/

I was using Gunze SM Super Gold and Super Fine Silver as a metallic and than cover it with clear yellow. The result I like best was clear yellow with some clear orange on Super Silver - but you'll have to find color that will fit for your needs.

I just don't know if you should use Super Chrome. It's the only paint from Super Metallic that shouldn't be covered because it will reduce "chrome" effect. Fine silver will be enough for this jon.