Author Topic: Puttying and Priming processes  (Read 2390 times)

July 06, 2010, 11:06:29 AM
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Tidalwave

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So normally, if there's scratches on a part, you putty, sand, and prime.
But what if, after priming, there are still scratches that need puttying?

Should you just put the putty over the primed (albeit scratched) surface?
Or sand off the previous layer of primer that's over the suspect areas, and then putty it up?

I almost exclusively use Tamiya Basic Type Putty, and I use Duplicolor automotive primer.  I've noticed that, whenever I apply putty on top of primed surfaces, it becomes a lot harder/stiffer after drying (when compared to puttying up a non-primed surface).  Should I not be doing this?...

July 06, 2010, 01:40:01 PM
Reply #1

Red Comet

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I always putty over primer and never have any problems. Primer is the best way to find imperfections that would otherwise be unseen on the bare plastic.

Unless the plastic is melting or becoming brittle, I wouldn't be too concerned.

July 07, 2010, 10:44:35 AM
Reply #2

Tidalwave

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Thanks for the response.

I would've figured that I should sand off the previous layer of primer.  That way, the recessed groves/scratches would still hold primer and would stand out against the now-unprimed surrounding parts, and I'd just putty that up, sand and re-prime.

I haven't had any real issues with putting the putty on top of the primed surface, save for the putty drying up harder.  I guess I'll keep doing it this way then.

October 04, 2010, 09:39:05 PM
Reply #3

Grail

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I generally prime,sand,fill,sand,prime,sand,possibly fill,sand again,primer,sand... going up in grits and not worrying about the layers. Like a car. The trick I found to help myself is to just keep it thin. You often get uneven wavy surfaces if you go mental and sand to the bone, then putty big clumps. I would say what your doing is probably fine.


..sorry, didn't notice the date.  :doh:
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 09:40:35 PM by Grail »
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