Author Topic: Glue Questions and Tips  (Read 23573 times)

January 20, 2007, 08:14:33 PM
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Oliphont

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Ello,

I was workin on a NO Grade 1/100 Freedom (alot of seams) when i really started to analyze my techniques and thought that for very long seams simply using putty over them was a very inefficient technique as it required too much sanding...

...so what my exact question is. I want to start using Cement to weld the pieces together; however, i do have 'Testors Cement for plastic models' will this work as well as the Tamiya Cement for welding the parts? because after close inspection of using the testors, i didnt see much welding taking place. Is it bassically the same formula?

I did search for seams, welding, and tamiya cement, with not much clarity to my question

thanks guys,
Felipe (Oli)

January 20, 2007, 08:26:18 PM
Reply #1

FichtenFoo

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No, it's a different formula. You'll have much better results with the Tamiya.

January 20, 2007, 09:07:04 PM
Reply #2

Oliphont

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K, thats what i figured from the pictures ive seen, ill pick up a bottle of each.

Thanks FF.

Was it a misconception to use alot of putty for just seams??

January 21, 2007, 12:55:09 PM
Reply #3

Oliphont

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OK, so i hit up my local hobbyshop...and they were out of the regular Tamiya Cement, so i picked up a bottle of 'Tamiya Extra Thin Cement' and 'Tenax 7R Space Age Plastic Welder'...

...so heres my question, i know most people use the Extra thin for topical use more than in between pieces, but will it work well (to weld) the pieces together if i use it in between the pieces rather than on top?

also, has anyone used the Tenax? Im afraid it mite be too strong, but im gonna try it out with scrap, just wondering if anyone else has used this.

thanks

January 21, 2007, 02:32:31 PM
Reply #4

Mindless

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Quote from: "Oliphont"
...so heres my question, i know most people use the Extra thin for topical use more than in between pieces, but will it work well (to weld) the pieces together if i use it in between the pieces rather than on top?


Yes, at least the cement I'm using.

Also, cllamping the two parts together will ensure a tight seam (less putty afterwards).

January 22, 2007, 02:19:37 PM
Reply #5

clee-cm

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Quote from: "Oliphont"
also, has anyone used the Tenax? Im afraid it mite be too strong, but im gonna try it out with scrap, just wondering if anyone else has used this.

thanks


I have used Tenax, I love the stuff... But you will have to use a paint brush to apply the stuff, but it works great; one important thing is that Tenax does evaporate quick, you have to apply the cement and quickly join the pieces together.

There is one cement called Ambro Weld, it works on most types of plastics including ABS, PVC, in addition to styrene. But I have not been able to find the stuff any more...
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January 22, 2007, 03:10:56 PM
Reply #6

Oliphont

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Quote from: "clee-cm"
Quote from: "Oliphont"
also, has anyone used the Tenax? Im afraid it mite be too strong, but im gonna try it out with scrap, just wondering if anyone else has used this.

thanks


I have used Tenax, I love the stuff... But you will have to use a paint brush to apply the stuff, but it works great; one important thing is that Tenax does evaporate quick, you have to apply the cement and quickly join the pieces together.

There is one cement called Ambro Weld, it works on most types of plastics including ABS, PVC, in addition to styrene. But I have not been able to find the stuff any more...


Yeah i was rather dissapointed to noticed it didnt have a brush built in, so i have to waste one of mine now >.>. Any tips on using it? Whats a good wait time to start sanding after welding with it? and any other random tidbits?

January 22, 2007, 04:40:04 PM
Reply #7

clee-cm

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This is how I used it: Since Tenax evaporates/dries fast, make sure the part is properly test fitted, prepared and cleaned  first before you start applying Tenax. With a brush, apply Tenax to both halves of the parts that will be joining, then with light pressure, join the parts together and hold them together for about 30 seconds or so. Your setting time will vary depending on how dry or humid you home is. Since San Diego is so dry, I have to apply several coats to the part since it evaporates quick.

After the glue sets, you will need to use some sand paper or a soft file and clean up the joint that has been glued together...

Tenax works fine for UCHG and MG Gundam models, for any model that has non-Styrene  Plastic parts, this is where I had trouble with Tenax. I built the DKM Scharnhorst, Strike Freedom Gundam, and a Sazabi using the Tenax, so I know it works...

If you are not sure how it will work, test it out on some unused model parts first.

Well, good luck on your model...
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January 22, 2007, 04:58:31 PM
Reply #8

GlauG

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Quote from: "clee-cm"
There is one cement called Ambro Weld, it works on most types of plastics including ABS, PVC, in addition to styrene. But I have not been able to find the stuff any more...


I use one called "Ambroid Proweld", sounds pretty similar.  I've managed to ruin at least 2 kits by spilling it on parts which it's then dissolved... X_x  I pick it up in hobby stores in the UK, but it's on the expensive side ($12 a bottle, I think?).

January 22, 2007, 07:49:22 PM
Reply #9

fredpekker

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Plastruct has a product called Plastic Weld that sounds like its similar to the Tenax you have, but the brush comes with the bottle. Works prettty much the same way.

January 22, 2007, 08:02:30 PM
Reply #10

Oliphont

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After much consideration, im not liking the Tenax too much. It dries way too quickly, and doesnt go on as thick as id like it. Time to wait for my local hobby to get some regular Tamiya Cement in :(...the Extra Thin wasnt bad for in between the pieces, but i think the regular kind would work better for me

January 22, 2007, 09:33:33 PM
Reply #11

clee-cm

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Quote from: "Oliphont"
After much consideration, im not liking the Tenax too much. It dries way too quickly, and doesnt go on as thick as id like it. Time to wait for my local hobby to get some regular Tamiya Cement in :(...the Extra Thin wasnt bad for in between the pieces, but i think the regular kind would work better for me


Yep - I had the same problem with Tenax, it works great when you get the hang of using it. But the quick evaporation is a problem that I also hate.

GlauG - "Ambroid Proweld", that is the stuff, I remember the product but not the exact name. Thanks for the help. Yes It works great, I also destroyed the veneer on a coffee table and a side table when I spilled part of the bottle twice.

I recommend Ambroid Proweld, this stuff works great. If you find it, get it...  :D
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January 23, 2007, 12:01:18 AM
Reply #12

GlauG

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A suggestion, on the assumption that the Tenax works like Proweld...  I find it usually works better if you hold the two parts you're joining together gently, then paint the stuff along the seam before squeezing.  I have these little springy clamp things I use for holding stuff like Gundam arms and legs together while they set, and it's usually a great bond once it's set.  If I paint it on both halves of something then put them together, half the time it doesn't set properly.

January 23, 2007, 08:08:51 AM
Reply #13

Oliphont

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Quote from: "GlauG"
A suggestion, on the assumption that the Tenax works like Proweld...  I find it usually works better if you hold the two parts you're joining together gently, then paint the stuff along the seam before squeezing.  I have these little springy clamp things I use for holding stuff like Gundam arms and legs together while they set, and it's usually a great bond once it's set.  If I paint it on both halves of something then put them together, half the time it doesn't set properly.


Yeah i was using clams, i think the only thing was the pieces i was welding were fairly large, so it took me a while to get em together with full coverage of the solution

January 23, 2007, 10:13:23 AM
Reply #14

clee-cm

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I have used both Proweld and Tenax, I think that Proweld is better than Tenax. Tenax is not good for very large pieces, it evaporates to quickly, with Proweld, you can join large pieces together.
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January 23, 2007, 10:15:57 AM
Reply #15

FichtenFoo

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I think this thread officially deserves a sticky. It's now called the Glue Questions and Tips thread.

January 23, 2007, 10:33:45 AM
Reply #16

Maschinen Krueger

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Does anyone notice a smell from a a bottle of Tamiya extra thin cement, even if the cap is screwed tight and it has sat for days with out being opened? I keep my stored in a cabinet, when I open the door, woosh, the smell of Tamiya cement right in the face. Man that stuff is strong.

BTW, Tamiya Extra thin is great stuff. You can create a weld bead with two parts on the seam. I brush both halves of the part to be joined, place together w/o a lot of force, and then hit the seam again with the Tamiya cement, let capilary action draw the glue down the part, and your fingertip, and then clamp or just press firmly for a few seconds, up to a min.

This also works with Testor's cement, though Testors' is less agressive and seems are more prone to break unless sufficient welding has occured.
I wonder about the guy that can sit through a David Lynch movie and say, "I saw that coming."

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January 23, 2007, 10:44:18 AM
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zerobxu

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The creation of this sticky coincides with a wonderful discovery I've made: CA glue is the best cut-sealer I've found. Not only does it glue the skin together, but it protects it! After I laid open my thumb with a large serrated bread knife on Saturday, I thought I'd need stitches. Nope. CA to the rescue, and all is well.

Remember, folks, that's C-A, and not B-A-N-D-A-I-D
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January 23, 2007, 10:46:25 AM
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oteebzo

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A friend of mine was in the Marines and he said that same thing . That when they are in the field they carry super glue with them for that same reason.

January 23, 2007, 10:49:42 AM
Reply #19

fulcy

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Super glue was originally developed for the armed forces, during vietnam, for use as a field applied suture.